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Friday, May 29, 2020

Weekly Post, "The Daze of My Life: Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography"

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography


Biographies are studies of someone's life based on cumulative research. Good ones may reveal something, but probably barely scratch the surface of what actually went on. The internet is allowing me to do something VERY different. 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum






Friday, May 29, 2020

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography #202:
Daze, #202:  In 1990, after 4-years of lobbying and exhibiting to promote the Tongass Timber Reform Act, it is finally passed and signed into to law by President George H.W. Bush. My Aperture book, The Tongass Alaska’s Vanishing Rain Forest, is widely credited with helping this get done, so in 1991, I am given the United Nations Global 500 Outstanding Environmental Achievement Award, and invited to the White House for an audience with the President. Aperture also publishes my third book, Overlooked in America: The Success and Failure of Federal Land Management. The images in this book were all created in the Cuyahoga National Recreation Area, where I previously completed a commission from the Akron Art Museum, and the National Park Service. The print work is toured by the museum extensively, but they do not want the expense of publishing a book. I am an “information collector” about various subjects that interest me, and I clip and file articles and news stories that I find related to those subjects. One of those has always been the management of public lands by the government, for which I have collected articles for more than 15-years. With funding several supportive donors, I re-purpose the Cuyahoga Valley imagery as “generic” American landscapes, and I draft paragraphic “bytes” about various land management issues and locations - some good, some bad - that span our 50 states. Interestingly, my accumulated clippings reveal how the span of time has shown progress in some cases, and serious decline in others. It is VERY revealing. I am also honored to have Charles Callison, one of the foremost authors on this subject matter, write a caustic essay for the book as well. Michael Hoffman, CEO of Aperture, says he is glad the pictures in the book are spectacular, because he thinks the short bytes, and Callison’s essay, are VERY dark. With the help of several non-profit environmental groups, this publication is handed out the the Congress, and I gift one to the President and his wife, Barbara, when we meet in the White House.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020 
@RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Weekly Post, The Cuyahoga River Valley: From Flames to Fame by Robert Glenn Ketchum

The Cuyahoga River Valley: 
From Flames to Fame
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1986, I was given a commission from the Akron Art Museum and the National Park Service to photograph the recently created Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area. My work helped put that location on the map, and since then, the NRA has been upgraded to National Park status, becoming one of the most visited parks in the national system.
~Robert Glenn Ketchum





Friday, May 29, 2020

Cuyahoga River Valley:  From Flames to Fame #11:
Cuyahoga #11:  Let’s take a break from CVNRA history, and go for a 4-season walk in the park. There are MANY great trails, and public access points as you can see here from the discreet staircase leading down to the water’s edge - a great place to sit and ponder at the height of fall, or to seek cooling refuge in the heat of summer.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Thursday, May 28, 2020

Weekly Post, "Welcome to Hotel California: Some Pictures from My Backyard" by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Welcome To Hotel California:  Some Pictures From My Backyard
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



I was born, and grew up in Los Angeles. As my professional career developed, I traveled around the
world working on various commissions, but seldom had opportunities to work in California. Nonetheless, I always came back “home,” and when there, I occasionally took pictures. For ten years I also taught a photography workshop on the Mendocino coast that provided some great visual moments as well. There is no “project” unifying these images, they are just my way of showing, “You can check out any time you like, but you can never leave!”   
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Thursday, May 28, 2020

Hotel California, Some Pictures From My Backyard, #40:
California #40:  By the light of the silvery lagoon, somewhere between Cayucos and Harmony.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Wach Gallery:  Wach Gallery

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Weekly Post, "Sundance: Artist-In-Residence" by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Sundance:  Artist In Residence
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



From 1987-1989, Robert Redford invited me to become the first visual Artist-In-Residence at his newly established Sundance Institute, part of the community he was building around his recently purchased ski resort in Utah. The residency provided me with subject matter that produced some of the most significant images of my career, but importantly, it also afforded me my first aerial work, a platform that would become increasingly important throughout my life. A limited amount of these images were ever published, and NONE of the aerials ever were. The best will now appear, please enjoy! 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Thursday, May 28, 2020

SUNDANCE: Artist In Residence, #98
Sundance #98  And, down in the valley below.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Wednesday, May 27, 2020

Weekly Post, THE SONORAN DESERT: Visiting with Don Juan by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE SONORAN DESERT: 
Visiting with Don Juan
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1988, I was contacted by Luther Propst, Director of the Rincon Institute of Tucson, AZ, who asked me if I could help them devise a campaign to protect a part of Saguaro National Monument from a massive real estate development that would disrupt substantial habitat.  
I did so, and we not only succeeded in mitigating the development, we added 30,000 acres to the monument, and got it upgraded to National Park status.  While doing this work, I fell in love with the Sonoran Desert, returning to it repeatedly, and visiting the many varied parts of it in Arizona, Mexico, and Baja, CA.  This is the tale of those visits. 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum





Wednesday, May 27, 2020

THE SONORAN DESERT:  Visiting with Don Juan #6:
Sonora #6:  It is called Saguaro National Monument and there are definitely numerous saguaro here, but there is SO much more. There are trees, varied grasses, moss covered rocks, lichen covered rocks, and an endless array of cacti. Many cacti also have a large diversity within just one species. There are many different barrel cactus, some of which are HUGE. There are ocotillo. There is a huge array of cholla, not just the “jumping” ones (post #4). Some are tree-like, some, like the teddy-bear, look fuzzy and stay low to the ground. There are several varieties of prickly pear, and also several varieties of cylindropuntia. Say what? (You will see a magnificent one of these in next week’s post.) In the image above there are quite a number of different grasses and trees, several different species of prickly pear, and dead center in this picture IS a cylindropuntia. Can you find it? What beautiful chaos!

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Weekly Post, NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by Robert Glenn Ketchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

 
Since 1998, I have been working to protect the spectacular resources of southwest Alaska and the fishery of Bristol Bay. Two Aperture books, a national traveling exhibition, a massive coalition of concerned users, and a lot of personal lobbying, had it looking like we were almost there. Then Donald Trump took office claiming he would always put America, and American jobs first. SO WHY destroy a BILLION-dollar-a-year, RENEWABLE salmon fishery and over 100,000 jobs for a group of international mineral speculators that will leave us with a Superfund site to clean up, and NO fishery left edible? And yet, he did,..so please, keep saying NO TO THE PEBBLE MINE!
~Robert Glenn Ketchum






Tuesday, May 26, 2020 

NO PEBBLE MINE #402, Pictures from Ground Zero
NO PEBBLE MINE #402:  Our flight crosses the mouth of Metervik Bay, and although we will ultimately head north, at the moment the convoluted coastline we parallel, is pointing in a southerly direction as it juts out into the expanse of Bristol Bay. A good distance offshore, I can see a scattering of islands, the two largest of which are High Island, and Crooked Island. Although we do not fly out to see them, my pilot tells me they are seldom visited, and thus have become massive bird rookeries because they lack predators. The day is getting late, and we will soon turn inland over the Togiak National Wildlife Refuge before heading back to Dillingham. My pilot and I have flown that territory before, so tonight he promises to take me over a different part of the refuge's vast expanse (4,102,537 acres), but he suggests that on some future flight, I might want to see yet another treasure of the Bristol Bay/Southwest Alaska territory, the Cape Newenham State Wildlife Refuge. Jutting dramatically out into Bristol Bay, the cape is a refuge within a refuge, and most consider it part of Togiak. At the extreme tip there is a long range radar station and a small airstrip managed by the US Air Force, but the rest of the ragged peninsula is for the birds, literally. Sadly, this is one place I never have the chance to visit.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

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Wach Gallery:  Wach Gallery
_____________________________________________________

Weekly Post: THE TONGASS: Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees
by Robert Glenn Ketchum
In 1985, I began a 2-year commission to explore the Tongass rainforest, the largest forest in the United States Forest Service (USFS) system AND the largest temperate rainforest in the world. It was a unique, old-growth environment under siege from industrial logging. The resulting investigative book I published helped to pass the Tongass Timber Reform Bill, protect 1,000,000 acres of old-growth, and create 11 new wilderness areas. This is the story of how that was achieved.




Tuesday, May 26, 2020

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #196, 
Tongass, #196:  After the previous day of interviewing loggers at a log camp, and then being driven indoors by a torrential rain, my assistant, Philip Slagter, and I, awake to an overcast sky at our B&B in Craig, but the rain has stopped. We are due to return to Ketchikan by ferry around midday, so we decide to eat breakfast, check out, and do one last cruise through some of the clearcut areas, closest to us, and along the road to the ferry terminal. As you have seen from the last 10 posts, most of the images I have made are singular frames, and most often of expansive views, so the first few shots of this morning start with that was as well, but it seems redundant. How many pictures of this destruction can one make, until they all start to look the same? As I ponder this dilemma, the overcast seems to be dissipating, and although there is still no sun, the day grows considerably brighter. With plenty of time still, before our departure, Philip and I wax philosophical about my artistic dead end of the moment, and in that conversation, he casually suggests that it is unfortunate that no one picture can capture the scale of the miles and miles of destroyed old growth forest that we have seen in the last three days. Prince of Wales is a vast island, and even though my pictures suggest the expanse of the destruction, sitting where we are, and looking out over the terrain, provides a very different sense of it than any one picture can do. Then a thought occurs to me. In my recently completed work in the Hudson River Valley, I occasionally used multiple frames to explore an expansive view. In that project, those views were grand, and most of the subjects beautiful. Here, perhaps I might render this subject in the same way to reveal the hideous.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
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Wach Gallery:  Wach Gallery
____________________________________________________

Monday, May 25, 2020

Weekly Post, High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers

High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



After receiving my MFA from CalArts, I was invited by Bill Lund, Sharon Disney’s husband, to come stay at the families' Diamond-D Ranch in Dubois, Wyoming. Bill thought I might like to photograph in the nearby Wind River Mountains, which I did, backpacking through them extensively over the next three summers. Welcome to a world of big granite walls and huge alpine lakes!
~Robert Glenn Ketchum





Monday, May 25, 2020

High and Wild:  Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers, #144, 
Wind Rivers, #144:  Carrying a very full, and weighty rig, Vicki Golden, and I, are glad to have the steep ascent of the switchback trail concluded. It is great relief to be alpine, and walking through the blooming meadows of late summer. It has been hot, and humid without rain all the way in, but in the late afternoon, at this altitude, we are finally experiencing some cooler air. The trail behind Vicki in this picture, plunges downward between the treeline and the granite wall, and it is a long walk out from where we are now, yet we are only halfway to our ultimate destination, Hay Pass, where we hope to cross over the Continental Divide. That being said, we are EXHAUSTED, and will not go much further today. Our walk through these meadows finally brings us to a small lake, so we have water and plenty of room for a comfortable campsite. Glad to get out from under the pack weight, we snack, drink, and set up. My black lab, Belle Star, is especially glad to have her saddlebags off, so she celebrates by chasing meadow eeks and swimming in the lake, while Vicki, and I, do food prep. It is a lovely evening, except the swampy lake hosts hordes of mosquitoes, so the headnets come out while we cook. From where we are, the trail goes up again, to a larger lake above us, but instead of resting for a day after such a long hike, we both agree we want to leave the mosquitoes behind if we can, so we retire early, because we will have another long, upward hike tomorrow.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd


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Weekly Post: "The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get" by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Growing up my parents had a home near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was there that I learned to ski. Over many years I befriended members of the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, with whom I had both life, and art-forming outdoor experiences. I had my camera, and these are my adventures. Enjoy!!  
~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Monday, May 252020

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #212: 
DFCFC, #212: Our ascent out of the Deep Lake basin is almost complete, and in a few hundred feet we WILL crest the dome bringing us beneath Temple Peak and the shore of Temple Lake. Our gradual line of upward traverse, however, has brought us to a garden of trees that Vicki and I visited during a 10-day summer camp in the previous year. It is an amazing series of benches festooned with gnarly, wind sculpted, ancient pines, interspersed with grassy patches abloom with wildflowers in the summer. One of our favorite places, and this tree, in particular, one of our favorite trees, post #121. Even in this more austere season, Gordon and Polly are suitably impressed. From our years of adventuring together in the mountains surrounding Sun Valley, ID, where Gordon and Polly live, he, and I, have become a mutual admiration society for the color and sculpture of high alpine limber pine, and this stunted trunk has been tortured by the ruthless winds that sweep this ridge, into a fantastic display of twisted arms. What a will-to-live, in spite of the relentless, hostile weather.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
PINTEREST:  pinterest.com/LittleBearProd
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Wach Gallery:  Wach Gallery
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