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Thursday, December 14, 2017

Weekly Post, High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers

High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

After receiving my MFA from CalArts, I was invited by Bill Lund, Sharon Disney’s husband, to come stay at the families' Diamond-D Ranch in Dubois, Wyoming. Bill thought I might like to photograph in the nearby Wind River Mountains, which I did, backpacking through them extensively over the next three summers. Welcome to a world of big granite walls and huge alpine lakes!





Thursday, December 14, 2017

High and Wild:  Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers, #16:
Wind River, #16:  We establish a pleasant camp, the weather passes, and except for too many mosquitoes, the evening is quite nice.The next day dawns sunny and warm with no weather showing as yet, so we shoulder daypacks and continue to explore the trail we have camped near. Surely if we follow it we will eventually find the famous Wind River granite alpine terrain. We walk some miles, however, and the trail remains relatively flat, and DOWN on the valley floor. It has become much warmer, and weather is now appearing, so we stop for lunch, and Chris breaks out his rod and reel to chase those also-famous Wind River trout. At this particular moment, he is “sneaking” up on an undercut bank where something might be hiding. There are fish, and he does catch them, but none of them are trout, they are all whitefish, and Chris is VERY disappointed. After his numerous attempts, we decide it isn’t getting any better, so we retrace our path to camp, and settle in for the evening, enjoying the fact that the weather of the day never got worse. Unfortunately, the mosquitoes did not go away!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
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Weekly Post, Big Mountain and Glacier National Park: Expanding My Winter Consciousness

Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - 
Expanding My Winter Consciousness
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In the early '70’s, I was doing a lot of winter adventuring with my friends in the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, and a client invited me to take pictures at Big Mountain, a ski resort in Montana. Glacier National Park was not far away, so I thought that might be an interesting place to explore in the winter, as well. These two locations added important work to my exhibits and portfolios, and definitely expanded/sobered my winter consciousness.  ~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Thursday, December 14, 2017

Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - Expanding My Winter Consciousness, #20:
Big Mountain, #20: My guides are “scouting” through the passages in the trees for an opening downhill where they might cut loose and ski, but the reason they proceed cautiously (last post) is that, not only will striking trees cause them to dump dangerous snowloads, the wind has created REALLY deep bowls around some tree bases, which I am warned I should avoid at all times. Falling into one of these and then having the tree dump would disappear you until the middle of next summer, something I need to be particularly aware of if I am to come back out here alone. I cannot actually see the bottom of this one! And, in flat light, skiing downhill, you might never see it coming.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Weekly Post, Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands: Bowing before St. Elias by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

The Yakutat Forelands are where the Tongass rainforest and the Chugach forest to the north meet. It is also home to many large glaciers, a stunning coastline, the huge Alsek-Tatshenshini river, and Icy Bay, which sits at the foot of Mount St. Elias, the greatest vertical rise from sea level in the world. There is a lot of powerful energy out here.



Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Adventuring on the Yakutat Forelands - Bowing before St. Elias, #49:
The Yakutat Forelands, #49: Our pilot is having fun with us because we are all awed by the rugged glacial surface and blue pools beneath us, which we can see in great detail because he is flying low and slow. It, therefore, takes us awhile to notice the body of water slowly emerging in front of us, Icy Bay. We are following an ice waterfall, down into a fjord it created over a millennia time, and now that ice is rapidly melting back, so seawater is filling the fjord being left. WE will soon be down there, paddling around in our little tiny rubber boats, and, literally, standing on the edge of the creation of the planet’s landscape. At the moment, we are flying over and viewing one of the forces that has created the bay, and little known to us, soon we would be experiencing others. This glacial expanse is quite broad and our flight follows the depression in the ice that bears to the left. As a photographer, what happens next is what I call, “a reveal" - the few moments of a quickly changing POV that cause a visually dramatic moment. It happens when you are aboard boats, and it happens especially quickly, when you are flying. As our flight drifts lower and lower towards the fjord, and we near the point where the Guyot Glacier reaches tidewater, such a moment occurs. For me as a photographer, it is dazzling and informative. For all of us as campers and kayakers, it is sobering.
photograph(s) © copyright, Robert Glenn Ketchum, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum, @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Weekly Post, ARCTIC: At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1993, I began traveling to the Arctic. I have been across The Northwest Passage by yacht; to the North Pole twice; to little-visited Russian islands; and aboard research vessels in Greenland, Labrador, Newfoundland, and Baffin Island, taking the opportunity to visit Iqualuit, the capital of Nunavut, the recently created Inuit nation and territories.




Wednesday, December 13, 2017

ARCTIC:  At the Cutting Edge of Climate Change, #70:
ARCTIC, #70:  A curious thing is happening as our flight progresses. Beneath me, a landscape unlike any other I have ever photographed is unfurling across hundreds of strange, spare islands. They are surrounded by an ocean that is shaded in blues that make the water look like the tropical Pacific. I am completely absorbed, BUT while I am having cosmic visions looking to the west, where the sky is clear and the water is open, directly in front of us, to the north, quite a different world is appearing on the horizon. John and our pilot are having a discussion about it, and intend to fly toward it, so John explains to me that “Itasca” will move north paralleling these islands we have been flying above, using the open water that we can see. Nonetheless, we will ultimately reach a point, where pack ice from the north is being channeled straight at us by the weather, and when wind drives the ice against the island shorelines, bergs stack up on top of each other and are molded together by pressure, making passage through them very difficult, if not impossible. So far this summer, much of the weather has been in our favor, so John is hoping to see that the ice has not been too compressed, and we will be able to navigate a course, using the helicopter to spot leads.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Weekly Post, THE TONGASS: Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1985, I began a 2-year commission to explore the Tongass rainforest, the largest forest in the United States Forest Service (USFS) system AND the largest temperate rainforest in the world. It was a unique, old-growth environment under siege from industrial logging. The resulting investigative book I published helped to pass the Tongass Timber Reform Bill, protect 1,000,000 acres of old-growth, and create 11 new wilderness areas. This is the story of how that was achieved.



Tuesday, December 12, 2017

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #68:
THE TONGASS, #68: Because the evening weather and light are still in our favor, our pilot knows this flight is for my photographic project and he offers to take us higher, into one of the peak sections protruding from the ice, so that I can see the actual spot at which some of these glaciers are born. We swing out over the icefield in a wide, rising arc, and then he turns the plane back towards distant summits. This particular cluster of peaks has several “small” glaciers, pouring down through various valleys and feeding into the larger glacial mass, now below our wing. When we arrive and encircle the collection of spires and summits, what we see are significant peaks that feature major walls, poking up out of a layer-cake of ice. The snow/ice weight is massive, and as gravity tugs it downward, it squeezes into side canyons and descends like a waterfall in slow-motion,..REALLY slow motion! Every winter adds hundreds of inches of snow to the surface. Every summer creates meltwater that flows beneath the glacier and lubricates its descent. Many mountain ranges in the world have been shaped by this action that can literally carve through rock. I am looking through my lens at some of the most powerful forces on earth, and I can SEE it in front of me. It is quite a night and quite a flight.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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