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Tuesday, June 28, 2022

Weekly Post, NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures From Ground Zero by Robert Glenn Ketchum (Posts #425+)

 NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures From Ground Zero by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Since 1998, I have been working to protect southeast Alaska, and the fishery of Bristol Bay. The fishery is an annually renewable, BILLION-dollar-a-year industry that employs thousands and thousands of workers in multiple states. 2021 provided the largest commercial salmon catch in history (64-million+). There is no intelligent reason to allow the proposed development of the Pebble mine to go forward and imperil these resources. The United Tribes of Bristol Bay, the United Fishermen of Alaska, Trout Unlimited, Trustees For Alaska, and the Natural Resources Defense Council, all oppose the development. Even Alaskan Senator, Lisa Murkowski, has stated her opposition. The momentum is building. Now is the time to SAY NO TO THE PEBBLE MINE permanently! 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum





Tuesday, June 28, 2022

NO PEBBLE MINE, Pictures from Ground Zero #511
NO PEBBLE MINE #511: 
This is Mirror Bay, another part of Nuyakuk Lake, and notably colored by azure blue water. In most of the rest of the lake (last post), the water is a deeper blue, but here the bay is fed by several streams of glacial meltwater, which has a lot of suspended, pale blue till in it, and as it mixes into the darker lake water, it creates this startling shade.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2022, 
@RbtGlennKetchum @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd 

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Weekly Post: THE TONGASS: Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees (#201+) by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees
by Robert Glenn Ketchum


In 1985, I began a 2-year commission to explore the Tongass rainforest, the largest forest in the United States Forest Service (USFS) system AND the largest temperate rainforest in the world. It was a unique, old-growth environment under siege from industrial logging. The resulting investigative book I published helped to pass the Tongass Timber Reform Bill, protect 1,000,000 acres of old-growth, and create 11 new wilderness areas. This is the story of how that was achieved.
~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Tuesday, June 28, 2022

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #305
Tongass, #305:  
Another feature of the Stikine river environment is the river constantly changing its elevation. On some cold days the fluctuation is negligible, but on hot days it may be significant. On this particular day, we took a break from our float to hike up to a glacier. Our camp was on a sandbar in the middle of numerous braids, and when we left for the hike in the morning, we walked through very shallow water to get to the shore, and go inland. The water was never close to our boot tops. The day was hot, and we lingered at the glacier to have lunch. On our hike out, we arrived at the same place where we crossed that morning, to find everything had changed. The flow of the river was much faster, and the water was significantly deeper. All of these changes occurred because the heat of the day dramatically increased the melting of the many glaciers that feed into the river, adding to considerably more volume. Because we were wearing packs, we needed to proceed as cautiously as possible, so to steady ourselves we got some sturdy debris branches. What was previously was ankle-deep water, was now thigh-deep, and flowing with enough force to sweep you off of your feet, so the branches allowed us a supportive tripod. Once we reached our camp sandbar, we had to remove our boots, pour the water out, and wring out our socks. A portion of our sandbar was now underwater, also.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2022,
@RbtGlennKetchum @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Monday, June 27, 2022

Weekly Post, High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers (#101+)

High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers
by Robert Glenn Ketchum




After receiving my MFA from CalArts, I was invited by Bill Lund, Sharon Disney’s husband, to come stay at the families' Diamond-D Ranch in Dubois, Wyoming. Bill thought I might like to photograph in the nearby Wind River Mountains, which I did, backpacking through them extensively over the next three summers. Welcome to a world of big granite walls and huge alpine lakes!
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Monday, June 27, 2022

High and Wild:  Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers, #254 
Wind Rivers, #254:  
Another lazy day when we all stayed close to camp. Travis and I climbed part way up the staircase waterfall coming out of Deep Lake, so he could find a pool deep enough to swim in. Then, on the way back to camp, he and LiLi took time out to chase some fish around. Here Travis is pointing out one to LiLi, but LiLi seems pretty fixed on another nearby.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2022,
@RbtGlennKetchum @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Weekly Post, GREENLAND, LABRADOR, and BAFFIN ISLAND: A Climate Change Research Expedition in the North Atlantic

GREENLAND, LABRADOR, and BAFFIN ISLAND:  A Climate Change Research Expedition in the North Atlantic by Robert Glenn Ketchum


 
In 2006, I was invited to participate in a Zegrahm expedition sponsored by the Harvard Museum of Natural History, The Nature Conservancy, and the World Wildlife Fund. I was to lecture aboard the ship, and to participate onshore, when visiting Inuit communities to discuss the effects of climate change on their lives. The trip would travel along the coast of southeastern Greenland, crossing the Labrador Sea, to the northwest coast of Labrador, and the southwest coast of Baffin Island.
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Monday, June 27, 2022 

GREENLAND, LABRADOR, and BAFFIN ISLAND:  A Climate Change Research Expedition in the North Atlantic, #90
GLB #90:  
Just outside of where the Iqaluit harbor mouth is supposed to be, the REALLY dense fog begins to lift, and once again shapes of landforms become more discernible. The trick now is to navigate into the harbor as far as the rising tide will allow us, so that we can all disembark for shore in the Zodiacs. Assuming this is accomplished, we will have several hours to explore this Capitol city before our buses round us up and take us to the airport for our trip back to the United States.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2022,
@RbtGlennKetchum @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Friday, June 24, 2022

Weekly Post, "The Daze of My Life: Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography"

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography


Biographies are studies of someone's life based on cumulative research. Good ones may reveal something, but probably barely scratch the surface of what actually went on. The internet is allowing me to do something VERY different. 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Friday, June 24, 2022

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography #310
Daze, #310:  
I wrapped up my work in Wood-Tikchik State Park ), and in 2004 Aperture published, “Wood-Tikchik: Alaska’s Largest State Park". The Alaska Conservation Foundation purchased 200-copies of it, and together with a second purchase of my previous book, “Rivers of Life: Southwest Alaska, The Last Great Salmon Fishery”, did a direct mail campaign to major foundations, and interested media, of this 2-book set. It did, indeed, attract significant media attention, and drew foundation funding from many sources, but most significantly, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation of San Francisco gave $10,000,000 over 3-years to purchase conservation easements of inholdings within the park, protecting critical rivers and fisheries.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2022,
@RbtGlennKetchum @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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An Alaskan Summer with Russell Daggatt, Kayaking, and Camping Adventures in Glacier Bay, and Hiking on Kruzof Island by Robert Glenn Ketchum

An Alaskan Summer with Russell Daggatt, Kayaking, and Camping Adventures in Glacier Bay, and Hiking on Kruzof Island by Robert Glenn Ketchum




To attempt some interesting kayak adventures, Carey and I needed a camp assistant, so Russell joined us to help.  
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Friday, June 24, 2022

An Alaskan Summer with Russell Daggatt, Kayaking, and Camping Adventures in Glacier Bay, and Hiking on Kruzof Island #21
Glacier Bay #21:  
The park service catamaran does not go to far into Johns Hopkins Inlet as there is so much ice, but it does linger for awhile so the passengers can enjoy the beauty of this fjord. There are numerous summits, almost all of which host glaciers, and at the lower elevations, nearest the waterline, there are granite terraces and benches, and many streams. Onboard are several park rangers on every trip to answer questions, and so I ask one about camping in the arm, and I am told it is very doable, and actually a relatively short kayak paddle from the Ptarmigan Creek drop off point. This was a camping trip that I totally wanted to do.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2022,
@RbtGlennKetchum @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Thursday, June 23, 2022

Weekly Post, "Welcome to Hotel California: Some Pictures from My Backyard" by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Welcome To Hotel California:  Some Pictures from My Backyard
by Robert Glenn Ketchum


I was born and grew up in Los Angeles. As my professional career developed, I traveled around the world working on various commissions, but seldom had opportunities to work in California. Nonetheless, I always came back “home,” and when there, I occasionally took pictures. For ten years I also taught a photography workshop on the Mendocino coast that provided some great visual moments as well. There is no “project” unifying these images, they are just my way of showing, “You can check out any time you like, but you can never leave.”   
~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Thursday, June 23, 2022

Hotel California, Some Pictures from My Backyard, #148
California #148:  
This is another image from my family home on Stone Canyon Road in Bel Air. I have waded into a gigantic clivia bed my mother began creating in the late 1940’s.
 
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2022,
@RbtGlennKetchum @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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The North Pole: Sitting on Top of the World by Robert Glenn Ketchum

  The North Pole:  Sitting on Top of the World

by Robert Glenn Ketchum




In 1998, and again in 2002, I had the opportunity to visit The North Pole, Franz Josef Land, Novaya Zemlya, and Yuzhny. Both times the journey was made possible aboard a nuclear Russian ice-breaker. These were unusual voyages into a strange-beautiful landscape, like no other on the planet, so hop aboard, and I will take you to some places you might not ever see otherwise.  
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Thursday, June 23, 2022

The North Pole: Sitting on Top of the World, #36
North Pole #36:  
Here, once again, we are in completely open water with a strong, cold breeze rippling the surface. The skyshow has returned as well. Clouds are streaming in multiple directions depending on their elevation. There must be some very strange air currents layered in this atmosphere.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2022,
@RbtGlennKetchum @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Thursday, February 3, 2022

Weekly Post, The Cuyahoga River Valley: From Flames to Fame by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE CUYAHOGA RIVER VALLEY: 
From Flames to Fame
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1986, I was given a commission from the Akron Art Museum and the National Park Service to photograph the recently created Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area. My work helped put that location on the map, and since then, the NRA has been upgraded to National Park status, becoming one of the most visited parks in the national system. 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum





Thursday, February 3, 2022

Hotel California, Some Pictures from My Backyard, #128
California #128:  
Fort Point in the Presidio of San Francisco, is located at the southern foot of the Golden Gate Bridge.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2021,
@RbtGlennKetchum @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, November 30, 2021

Weekly Post: THE TONGASS: Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees by Robert Glenn Ketchum (#100-199)

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1985, I began a 2-year commission to explore the Tongass rainforest, the largest forest in the United States Forest Service (USFS) system AND the largest temperate rainforest in the world. It was a unique, old-growth environment under siege from industrial logging. The resulting investigative book I published helped to pass the Tongass Timber Reform Bill, protect 1,000,000 acres of old-growth, and create 11 new wilderness areas. This is the story of how that was achieved.
~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Tuesday, June 16, 2020

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #199, 
Tongass, #199:  In 1986, I return to the Tongass rainforest for a second summer to complete my commission. In the previous summer, my assistant had been my friend, and fellow artist, Philip Slagter. This summer, I will be joined by various other friends at different points of the project, spread over several months. The first trip I organize is to return the Ketchikan, from where I intend to access a US Forest Service cabin on the shore of Goat Lake in Misty Fjords National Monument. Philip and I had seen the lake and cabin in a flightsee the summer before, and I had yet to use the resources of these many USFS cabins, spread throughout the Tongass, so I wanted to see what they would be like. I am joined now by another photographer and his wife, Krys and Jan Cianciarulo, who will be my first assistants of this year. Goat Lake is large, and it sits in a granite basin about 1,800ft. above a fjord. It has a spectacular waterfall pouring out of it, and the reason the USFS built a cabin in such a place was to provide goat hunters access to the high country. To get there, we will take a float plane out of Ketchikan, and land on the lake. We will only be there for three days, but they will be quite unique because this is high alpine rainforest, in one of the wettest parts of all of the Tongass, often receiving 325” of rain, and sometimes more.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, June 9, 2020

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #198, 
Tongass, #198:  In 1992, I was invited to have a major one-person exhibition at the Houston FotoFest. When I received the diagrams of the various galleries I would use, the entrance to the space featured large, curved walls. Since there were ample galleries throughout, rather than hang framed images on the curved walls, I decided to do something else, and I created unique prints for that room. Taking advantage of the new Fuji Crystal Archive digital print materials, I created several prints that would be hung without frames, just using clips and pins, allowing them to curve with the wall. The image above is “Roads to Nowhere (5,000 miles and growing)” measuring 48”x 150”. I took this photograph on Prince of Wales Island the first summer of my Tongass rainforest commission. The print incorporated the text you see to the right, which is too small to read as a jpg., so here is what it says:

The Tongass National Forest of southeast Alaska is the largest intact temperate rainforest in the world, and nurtures North America’s greatest concentrations of eagles, and grizzly bear. Freshwater river systems support abundant wild salmon populations, and the marine environment sustains a healthy diversity of shellfish, crab, halibut, seal, and whale.

In spite of this, over one billion dollars of the American taxpayer’s money has been spent as corporate welfare, subsidizing timber companies to build more than 5,000 miles of road in order to access and clearcut the forest. Most of the usable wood from these clearcuts is shockingly undervalued, and sold at this discount to Japan. The clearcuts also damage or fragment valuable habitat, negatively impacting the recreational tourism, and wild commercial fishing industries, whose long-term contributions to the state economy are sustainable, and ultimately have greater value.

According to a 10-year schedule recently published by the Department of the Interior, $165 million additional tax dollars will be spent to underwrite a substantial amount of new corporate road building. Many of the roads proposed will be constructed in 50 areas presently designated to be roadless.

Our tax dollars are being used to assist profitable private industries in building roads that lead to nowhere, and damage valuable public resources. At the same time, the nation’s infrastructure of highways and bridges is deteriorating, and most urban areas suffer crippling traffic and gridlock, because they lack the necessary federal funding to repair, improve, and expand transportation systems that already exist.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RobertGKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, May 26, 2020

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #196, 
Tongass, #196:  After the previous day of interviewing loggers at a log camp, and then being driven indoors by a torrential rain, my assistant, Philip Slagter, and I, awake to an overcast sky at our B&B in Craig, but the rain has stopped. We are due to return to Ketchikan by ferry around midday, so we decide to eat breakfast, check out, and do one last cruise through some of the clearcut areas, closest to us, and along the road to the ferry terminal. As you have seen from the last 10 posts, most of the images I have made are singular frames, and most often of expansive views, so the first few shots of this morning start with that was as well, but it seems redundant. How many pictures of this destruction can one make, until they all start to look the same? As I ponder this dilemma, the overcast seems to be dissipating, and although there is still no sun, the day grows considerably brighter. With plenty of time still, before our departure, Philip and I wax philosophical about my artistic dead end of the moment, and in that conversation, he casually suggests that it is unfortunate that no one picture can capture the scale of the miles and miles of destroyed old growth forest that we have seen in the last three days. Prince of Wales is a vast island, and even though my pictures suggest the expanse of the destruction, sitting where we are, and looking out over the terrain, provides a very different sense of it than any one picture can do. Then a thought occurs to me. In my recently completed work in the Hudson River Valley, I occasionally used multiple frames to explore an expansive view. In that project, those views were grand, and most of the subjects beautiful. Here, perhaps I might render this subject in the same way to reveal the hideous.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, May 19, 2020

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #195, 
Tongass, #195:  After our morning in a logging camp on Prince of Wales Island doing interviews, my assistant, Philip Slagter, and I, go on a “field trip” with one of the loggers to see where he has been working. Nicknamed, “Woodie,” he takes us to a cut where he is currently gathering slash (debris wood to be burned), and after explaining the extent of the tract, he brings us to a “view” location for some picture taking. While I do take some overview shots, on an increasingly gray and rainy day, I am draw to the matching tonal colorations of a pile of slash timber and the gray sky above. When Woodie sees me making a picture there, he announces that this is a burn pile he accumulated entirely by himself, a sizable task. Acknowledging his considerable accomplishment, I make the image that appears in the previous post, one of my most purchased industrial image prints. Shortly thereafter, the sky falls in and it begins to rain hard, so we return to the logging camp where we share further conversation with the loggers,..and drink. Philip and I have now been “in country” long enough to drink with the best of them, so we do. Not really in condition to drive shitty roads back to Craig, we do so anyway, and I am just crazy (and drunk enough) to still stop and take pictures (above). Finally, driven into our car by rainfall, we wend our way back to town, where we crash at our bed-and-breakfast, BUT not before some food and further drinking in a “local favorites” bar. Really? Really!

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, May 12, 2020

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #194, 
Tongass, #194:  After our first day of road-tripping on Prince of Wales Island (last 6 posts), my friend, and assistant for the summer, Philip Slagter, and I return to a B&B in Craig for the night. In the morning we are met by a “guide” who is willing to take us into a logging camp where we will be allowed to photograph and do interviews. The loggers have been told we are just “observing” for a book I am writing, but the point-of-view in my work is not mentioned. Even so, totting cameras and tape recorders, and dressed in state-of-the-art Patagonia gear, they clearly treat us with polite suspicion (as well they should). We spend the morning in the “mess” shack, drinking coffee and having a “round-table” discussion with several of them, and then one of them named “Woodie,” offers to take us to a cut where we can make pictures. It is a cold, grey day, raining off-and-on, and although I do make a number of pictures of larger overviews, the one that has resonated in my book and throughout my exhibits is above. The silver-grey tonalities are amplified by my Cibachrome printing process. This is a pile of slash that has been collected to be burned, and Woodie hauled all of this here, by himself, something he was quite proud of. I am sure it was A LOT of work, SO, this is, “Rootwads and Slash/Ode to Woodie.” The sad end to a patch of old growth Tongass rainforest.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, May 5, 2020

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #193, 
Tongass, #193:  My last post jumped one summer ahead to show you a map of what Philip Slagter, and I, are discovering on the ground in our first summer. Prince of Wales Island has a very few “main” roads, but off of those main roads, hundreds of spurs, extend out into thousands of even smaller spurs, and they penetrate every stand of timber they can find, accessing and clearcutting the forest into a patchwork of destroyed old growth habitat, and decimating hundreds of salmon spawning streams. The cutting is reckless, and wasteful, leaving massive amounts of down timber to rot, and referencing it as unusable “slash.” This kind of management of a rare and valuable PUBLIC resource is the disgrace of the US Forest Service. If our politicians really want to reform and reduce government excess, they should start by “clearcutting” all those who manage “harvesting” the resource they should enriching. These people draw their salaries from our tax dollars, but they work for a few select timber companies, some of which are not even American owned. This habitat and its MANY renewable resources are OUR trees, and OUR salmon, and they are being devastated by corporations, in many cases from abroad, that could not care less, they just want to be profitable turning the Tongass into pulp, so they can sell diapers to the 3rd World. To me, this is a CRIMINAL activity.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, April 28, 2020

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #192, 
Tongass, #192:  By the second summer of my visits to the Tongass, what I am doing there is known to many. My wife Carey has joined me to do interviews with people, and we talk to quite a range of them including fishermen, loggers, retail merchants, and cruise operators. One day, however, stands out as particularly unique. We are in a hotel in Juneau when the phone rings, and the caller identifies himself as a US Forest Service employee that wants us to show us something he thinks will be VERY revealing about the timber harvest on Prince of Wales Island. Interested, we agree to meet him for lunch, and he asks that we do so at a remote cafe, well outside of town, where none of his fellow employees might see us together. When we meet, he is also out of uniform as a further precaution. While having casual conversation about our project, he asks if we had been to Prince of Wales, and if we know the USFS public line about their limited roadbuilding. We have, and do. USFS “press” claims their roading activities are VERY limited, and especially respectful of all salmon streams. At this point, he casually passes several rolled maps over to Carey, saying “This is what is actually being done. Don’t open them here.” He then asks if we really intend to publish such documents, and when we respond, yes, if they are pertinent, he says we will surely anger A LOT of people, and some will lose their jobs. Then he asks if we use USFS wilderness cabins when we trek, advising that if we do, we should no longer register for our permits under our actual names, because “hunting accidents happen all the time in the rainforest.” When we get back to our hotel and unroll the maps, this (above) is what we find. On the USFS maps that have been released to the public, there is fine print text at the bottom, in a little noticed disclaimer stating, “no roads under two miles in length are shown because of scale.” On these maps we have been given, literally thousands of “spur” roads under two miles in length scrawl every which way, blanketing the island. We published these maps in our Aperture book, The Tongass: Alaska’s Vanishing Rainforest, making the real truth public for the first time.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, April 21, 2020

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #191, 
Tongass, #191:  In many cases, the logging corporations try to make their deforesting operations, more “discreet” to the tourist’s eye. Cruise ship passengers are the largest group of visitors, so many cuts are on an island's interior. Near a shore where it might be more visible, loggers may leave a “screen” of trees at the edge of the beach, then clearcut everything behind it. On the roads around Prince of Wales, a similar game is played with many of the cuts being “screened” from the most driven roadways. traveling these main roads, you do see cuts, but should you turn on to one of the smaller side roads, within a short distance you will arrive at an epic “ground zero” with a complex hatch-work of roads and spurs, eating into the forest in every direction. This road engineering and design is one of the most publicly deceitful acts that the logging companies pursue, and it is all done with the approval of the US Forest Service. Please stay tuned for the next post - I will show you the “map trick,” from actual USFS maps, leaked to me by a disgruntled employee, who was opposed to the further destruction of the largest temperate rainforest in the world.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2020, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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