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Monday, September 18, 2017

Weekly Post, The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Growing up my parents had a home near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was there that I learned to ski. Over many years I befriended members of the Decker Flat Climbing and Frisbee Club, with whom I had both life, and art-forming outdoor experiences. I had my camera, and these are my adventures.  Enjoy!!  ~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Monday, September 18, 2017

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #72:
THE HIGHER YOU GET, THE HIGHER YOU GET, #72:  In my life as a photographer, I have learned that you never know when it is going to be “one of those days.” Certainly, as I step outside Pioneer Cabin in the morning to be greeted by several feet of new snow, and a continuing snowfall, I do not yet know what is about to happen. Locking into my skis, and arranging my cameras so they are protected, I wonder whether there are any pictures to be made AT ALL, given the flat light and limited visibility. (NB: I ALWAYS work with my gear OUT, never in a backpack, because working with a group, there is no convenient time to stop and slow everyone else down. I need to be able to work, WITHOUT any interruption to those that I am with.) As we begin the ascent of the ridgeline to our north, the storm increases intensity and the snow really comes down. In one of my “rest” stops, I look around at our group through the haze of falling crystals, and have to laugh because it strikes me we are a photo-workshop that has completely lost it’s mind. Every one of us has cameras, and Peter Eaton has a giant 16mm film/sound system with which he is attempting to work. At any given moment, someone stops to fiddle with their cameras, but it is hard to imagine anybody is getting pictures in this storm,..and then, I realize I am standing next to this. We have ascended the ridge to the point where there are many limber pine (post #64), and I have stopped at the foot of quite a large one. The more I study this pine, the stranger it becomes. The details and textures of the wood seem etched. The pine, itself, seems to glow a bit and stand out from all the other trees nearby. Trying to decipher this through my lens, I have a moment of realization drawn from photographic history: Edward Weston made remarkable pictures of his assistant/muse/wife, Charis Wilson in the sand dunes of Oceano. What was striking about the images was the light upon here nude body - because the dune was so reflective, there was as much light reflecting back from the sand on Charis, as there was light falling on her from the sun - shadows disappeared and her body seemed to glow and float. Weston called it axial lighting. In the bright, but flat, light of this storm, there is little detail in the snow around me but it is reflecting “axial” lighting back on this tree - there are few shadows, as everything is equally illuminated from all sides. This my Charis!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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A Tale of Two Futures: Alaskan Wild Salmon vs. the Pebble Mine by Joel Reynolds, NRDC

A Tale of Two Futures: Alaskan Wild Salmon vs. the Pebble Mine

by Joel Reynolds, Western Director, Senior Attorney, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC)
Reprinted with permission by the Author.
Originally published on Huffington Post.

For anyone still unclear about the irreconcilable disconnect between the rich heritage of Alaskans and the overriding financial self-interest of The Pebble Partnership, it was on stunning display in Bristol Bay’s wild salmon fishery this summer.

Weekly Post, STONED IMMACULATE: A Trip in the Desert by Robert Glenn Ketchum

STONED IMMACULATE:  A Trip in the Desert
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

As a young photographer, two places I “discovered” by chance greatly influenced both my photographic vision and my personal relationship with the greater planet. A previous blog, LIMEKILN, is the story of the first location. THIS is the second location which I discovered because my car broke down. As Jim Morrison/The Doors wrote, “Out here we is stoned Immaculate!"


Monday, September 18, 2017


Stoned Immaculate, #46:
Immaculate, #46: Vicki Golden is once again giving scale to this photographic image from my series, STONED IMMACULATE, which has been drum-scanned onto canvas with airbrushes and then stretched and framed like a painting. It is here displayed as part of the corporate collection of the Fluor Corporation in their recently built west coast headquarters. Unfortunately, although brilliantly colorful in their sterile surrounding, the images are seen as “confusing” - are they paintings, or are they actually photographs of something? If they are photographs, have they been altered (why would that matter, but no they have not been)? Which way is up? If you will note from the original image posted last week in correct orientation, this huge print has been installed upside-down (because it looked better). You can see where this is going. Fluor would like to do more images of this size, BUT they want to work with my more traditional landscapes, instead of this series, and I do not see those images suitably reproducible in this way. I decline further work. Although grateful for the experience/experiment, and convinced my quest for a large scale for this series will be resolved in other ways, I turn my attention to what equipment will give me the size of print that I want with the detail, texture, and colors that I see.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Friday, September 15, 2017

Weekly Post, The Daze of My Life: Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography


Biographies are studies of someone's life based on cumulative research. Good ones may reveal something, but probably barely scratch the surface of what actually went on. The internet is allowing me to do something VERY different. 
~Robeert Glenn Ketchum



Friday, September 15, 2017

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography #63:
Daze, #63: This image, “Avalanche Lake Basin (Cirque Headwalls in a Blizzard)” becomes the third photograph from my mid-winter, camping, ski-tour of Glacier National Park to go into my portfolio, “Winters:1979-1980”. It has another life, however, related to the work I do when I am not on the road. Back in Los Angeles, between my travels, I am also serving as a curator for the Los Angeles Center for Photographic Studies. When I began working with LACPS, Victor Landweber, and I put up a number of shows of different individual artists, at varying locations in the city. Notable among them, a great exhibit from Peter DeLory, and another from Joyce Niemanas. (When she visited for her exhibit, she met my former teacher, Robert Heinecken and they would become partners until his death.) Because LACPS is an artist's collective with no director, it is often difficult, or contentious, to get things done, so the successful programs operate like individual projects. I get very lucky to discover of the life-body of photographs of important color photographer, Paul Outerbridge, in Laguna Beach, and my partner at the time, Vicki Golden ( post #58), and I develop this collection into an exhibit and catalog for LACPS that is awarded a National Endowment for the Arts Grant. The project's national success, results in me being elected Executive Director of LACPS. Victor Landweber also shifts his focus in an important way, with an idea to raise funds for our group by publishing a boxed portfolio of prints representing the photographic scene in LA at the moment. The portfolio is large, and includes many members of LACPS. It is also a GREAT selection of work and artists, thanks to Victor, and it sells out immediately, almost all editions going to major museums. There is one landscape of the natural world included in the portfolio, this is it. Printed 11”x 14” (edition of 45).
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017 
@RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Thursday, September 14, 2017

Weekly Post, Big Mountain and Glacier National Park: Expanding My Winter Consciousness

Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - 
Expanding My Winter Consciousness
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In the early '70’s, I was doing a lot of winter adventuring with my friends in the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, and a client invited me to take pictures at Big Mountain, a ski resort in Montana. Glacier National Park was not far away, so I thought that might be an interesting place to explore in the winter, as well. These two locations added important work to my exhibits and portfolios, and definitely expanded/sobered my winter consciousness.




Thursday, September 14, 2017

Big Mountain and Glacier National Park - Expanding My Winter Consciousness, #7:
Big Mountain, #7: The Going-to-the-Sun Road winds on for longer than I expect, and the vertical walls around me seem encroaching. I am driving in a DEEP glacially-carved valley, and the walls rise more abruptly than any other mountains I have ever explored. It is intimidating. Not the least of which, every once in awhile, a steep, treeless chute comes all the way into the trees, just beyond the edge of the road. These are avalanche corridors, swept clean of growth by slides that descend from 6,000ft directly above. THIS does give me some pause about a winter approach, but still the road seems broad and safe, and none of these chutes appears to cross it, so I remain hopeful. Finally the road switches back and begins to rise across the face of The Continental Divide headed toward Logan Pass. The Going-to-the-Sun Road is an amazing feat of engineering. A narrow, ascending cut across the face of big walls, and often requiring tunnels, the road rise sheerly up on one side, above me, and drops off frighteningly on the other side, plunging down to the valley I just drove through. Here, on this part of the road, the avalanche chutes DO appear to cross, so if I actually get this far, being here is going to take perfect conditions or I will be greatly at risk.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2017, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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