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Friday, June 24, 2016

Abstract, "Political Conflict and Spiritual Battle: Intersections between Religion and Politics among Brazilian Pentecostals" by Carlos Gustavo Sarmet Moreira Smiderle and Wania Amelia Belchior Mesquita

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Political Conflict and Spiritual Battle: Intersections between Religion and Politics among Brazilian Pentecostals 
by Carlos Gustavo Sarmet Moreira Smiderle and Wania Amelia Belchior Mesquita

A new interpretation of Evangelical actors’ increasing participation in Brazilian political and electoral contests is that elements of Pentecostalism predispose a believer to see the world as the site of an eternal struggle between God and Satan. The belief in demons that have territorial jurisdictions, known as territorial spirits, is one aspect of this theology. The cognitive universe of this belief induces the Evangelical voter to make electoral decisions on the basis of religious premises. It teaches the voter to conceive, without much reflection, the spiritual battle and the electoral game as territorial disputes.

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.


Friday, June 24, 2016

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient, #122
SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient #122 - 1985 to the Present:   And finally, there is this, or these as the case may be. If you are confused by this, so was I, and I was standing there. Besides the architectural light show scrolling around on the tall buildings, and the other neon nuttiness floating and driving by, in this particular district, the street lights have been replaced by this display. There are trees that line the sidewalks and so large, bright spotlights have been put in the cradle where the first branching out occurs. This is A LOT of light and it illuminates all the upper branches against the dark of the night sky. Select trees even have colored gels over their light. ALL the trees, however, have their branches strung with a lighting display I have not yet seen elsewhere. It consists of a glow stick about 3ft in length that hangs from a cord. The stick lies dark for a moment, then a flash lights up the top, and that glowing ball then descends the length of the stick, much like a drop of water. The effect of this along the entire street was pretty off the chart, and gave new meaning to the phrase, "a light rain is falling."
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Shanghai

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
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Thursday, June 23, 2016

Welcome to SUZHOU, 1985 - to the present by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer 
Robert Glenn Ketchum.


Thursday, June 23, 2016

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present, #123
Suzhou #123:   I was in a relatively new hotel, but it had been built by Chinese investors, not an international group, and so there were many features to the hotel grounds that not only echoed the culture but the historic gardens around Suzhou. This is a small section of the hotel garden between rooms, replete with a designed stone path, various Taihu rocks, a small moon bridge, and lush vegetation. As the back wall of the hotel lies adjacent an historic park and garden, one of these paths through the hotel grounds leads to an unannounced gate from which guests may access that park. The gardens within the historic park are quite nice as well, but the main attraction to me are the numerous, well-renovated structures that date back centuries. One of those is an original canal gate through the a remaining portion of the fortified wall built around the heart of the old city. The other is a VERY tall ancient pagoda tower. Amazing! Next week, come take a walk in the park with me. 
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Suzhou

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
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SILK ROAD - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

Silk Road - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

The city of Suzhou, China, produced China's most beautiful silk and silk embroidery practiced by generational families for 3,000 years. My purpose in going to China starting in the mid-1980's was to turn my photographs into textiles, and this is my story. ~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Thursday, June 23, 2016

Silk Road - Embroideries #179
SILK ROAD #179:   By this time we had done many embroideries with trees and the rendering of them had become a challenge to "improve" their stitch design with each new subject. In the case of "Lakeshore in Morning Fog," the trees were clustered along the shoreline but actually only occupied a small part of the image, so the embroiderers lavished a great deal of time on them using a wide variety of stitches and integrating them in complicated ways. This detail features random stitching, bundle stitches in layers, and looping stitches, which were intended as highlights. I also chose this detail because you can see the matrix clearly. A pale green color was chosen and there has been no stitching of any kind done in the sky. As this embroidery developed, Zhang repeatedly reminded me that the subtle mottling of the sky tones was my problem, and I assured her that I had a plan that would compliment the beautiful work being done.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Embroidery @WesCFA @RSSDesigns
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Wednesday, June 22, 2016

TATSHENSHINI: Saving a River Wild

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1990, I was invited on a 10-day float down the Tatshenshini, a huge river system flowing from Western Canada to the Pacific Ocean that literally divides two of North America's largest national parks, Canada's Kluane National Park and Alaska's Glacier Bay National Park. A gold mine was being proposed mid-river. I broke the story in LIFE magazine. There were many other articles and a book. The mine was never developed and the river is now a wilderness corridor. This is a conservation SUCCESS story!


Wednesday, June 22, 2016

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #107
TATSHENSHINI - Saving a River Wild, #107:   It was late and the sun was getting low on the horizon. The clear air was bathed in the glow of evening. Often cold winds flow down off of glaciers, especially late in the day, but amazingly tonight as the sun was setting, the wind picked-up AND IT WAS WARM! Sitting on the sandy point pondering and taking pictures, I watched two fairly large bergs finally drift by, and it was notable that driven by the wind, they were REALLY moving along. Soon we would get back in our rafts and push off, entering the lake and floating along the western shore to pass around a rocky dome. On the other side of the dome is a large sandy beach adjacent the Alsek River outlet to the Pacific, which we would float the next day to our pick-up point. As one last stretch for my body, I walked over the berm to the small cove that looks directly east at glaciers coming out of Canada. The last time I was here, the winds off the glacier had driven massive amounts of driftwood into the cove (post #43), but tonight it looked VERY different!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Tatshenshini @glacierbaynps @Life @Wilderness #WeAreTheWild @nature_AK

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
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Abstract, "The Legacy of Liberation Theology in Colombia: The Defense of Life and Territory" by Leila Celis

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The Legacy of Liberation Theology in Colombia: The Defense of Life and Territory 
by Leila Celis

Liberation theology was very important in Latin America between 1970 and 1980. While it is less significant today, it has not disappeared. If we look at Colombia, we can see the pastoral and political commitment of the religious and the laity in various regions as they accompany marginalized communities, victims of government and parastatal violence, in conformity with their preferential option for the poor. Motivated by the crucified Christ, the heirs of liberation theology have developed a theology of life or of human rights. As human rights advocates, they identify among the causes of violence the policies of capitalist development, denounced as imperialist and responsible for the poverty of the majority of the population. This development has its origin in the parallel dynamics of social and international relations and the associated adaptation of the social movement.

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

To celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act (#Wilderness), this new blog focuses on a wilderness area in the #Tongass rainforest of southeast Alaska. This is the tale of a 10-day kayak trip - a testament to WHY wilderness is important, by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.




Tuesday, June 21, 2016

TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #96
TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #96: We are exhausted. The loaded boats are heavy. The tide is dropping. Rain squalls are blowing through. AND, we are so out-of-here! We just spent the last ten days during a maximum tidal period "recreating" nearly 30-miles into one of the deepest coastal fjords in North America. Our paddle took us back in geologic time quite literally, and our camps were some of the most inventive and dramatic in my entire life of outdoor adventuring. It is important to note that there are a very few trips I have made that I can say this about, and they ALL have occurred in ESTABLISHED WILDERNESS AREAS. These "explorations" into wilderness have shaped my thinking as an artist, and my awareness as a human being. Never have I felt more in tune with the planet. For me, being in these places was a privilege, protecting and creating more places like this is a moral obligation, and so is passing on the enjoyment of them so there will generational defenders.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wilderness #Wilderness #Tongass

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
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Monday, June 20, 2016

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Growing up my parents had a home near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was there that I learned to ski. Over many years I befriended members of the Decker Flat Climbing and Frisbee Club, with whom I had both life, and art-forming outdoor experiences. I had my camera, and these are my adventures.  Enjoy!!



Monday, June 21, 2016

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #7:
THE HIGHER YOU GET, THE HIGHER YOU GET - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #7:  As you can see from the last post, on days when I did not ski I would go out and drive around with my cameras, working with things the road made available to. When I started to shoot the landscape, I had been told I would NEED to use a larger format camera than my 35mm, so I very consciously began to work with the Hasselblad I had been loaned. For those of you who are not camera techies, a Hasselblad shoots 120mm film (about 3x larger than a 35mm slide), and since it was designed as a studio portrait camera, it is also a square format (convenient for cropping in either direction). While I did like the larger film image and knew it would make a better print, the Hasselblad WAS a studio camera and it did NOT like being outdoors in the cold and the dust. It especially did not like the cold because it had a very large, thin "leaf" shutter, and once it got below freezing for any length of time, the shutter would freeze and the camera would not operate until it thawed out.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Abstract, "New Forms of the Relationship between Politics and Religion: Ecclesiastical Base Community Activists in Mexico City" by Hugo José Suárez

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New Forms of the Relationship between Politics and Religion: Ecclesiastical Base Community Activists in Mexico City 
by Hugo José Suárez

Beginning in the 1960's, new forms of living the faith emerged in Latin America that linked it with a political dimension. The Catholic Church changed its pastoral orientation, and ecclesiastical base communities were established as part of an “option for the poor.” The reflection that accompanied this process was known as liberation theology. By the end of the 1970's these communities were organizing conferences, publications, and theological reflections with strong international links and included hundreds of believers both in the countryside and in the city. During the following two decades, they were active participants in the construction of leftist political alternatives. While a minority pastoral practice today, they continue to hold national gatherings and maintain their international contacts. In-depth interviews with three members of ecclesiastical base communities in a working-class neighborhood in Mexico City show how these individuals have built their socio-religious practice and their religious beliefs. Their experience is part of a global reconstitution of belief systems in Mexico that affects all of the salvation enterprises in their various expressions.

Where It All Began: LIMEKILN CREEK by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Where It All Began:  Limekiln Creek by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1967, I discovered Limekiln Creek on the Big Sur Coast in California. Among those redwoods, I had an epiphany as a young artist. As a photographer, most of the skills I would use, I would learn there. Many years later in a mature career, I helped the American Land Conservancy acquire this property for the California State Park system. This is the story of a very personal place.



Monday, June 20, 2016

Where It All Began:  Limekiln Creek, #25
Where It All Began - Limekiln Creek, #25:  Over the years I would learn this more discreet canyon was almost always dark and only for a few hours a day got any scattered sun. The creek filled the canyon floor leaving virtually no evidence of a trail there, and the angular rocks in the creek were always slippery and dangerous. To explore this canyon, the "trail" was served by fallen logs and debris jams. Look carefully at this picture, and if you have been following this blog, you will immediately recognize "my" path has been one that connected multiple logs (far left). Although there was little evidence of foot traffic, I was headed to a very popular destination, a large, sunny pool with A LOT of sun exposure in the afternoon. In fact, this spot was SO popular with hard-core Big Sur forest trolls, that because it was quite rocky surrounding the pool, they constructed a large wood platform so people could lay down in the sun and dry off after swimming.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd, #LittleBearProd, ALC (@american_land), Monterey Pop Festival (@MontereyPopFest)
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