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Friday, April 29, 2016

Abstract, "Political Conflict and Spiritual Battle: Intersections between Religion and Politics among Brazilian Pentecostals" by Carlos Gustavo Sarmet Moreira Smiderle and Wania Amelia Belchior Mesquita

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Political Conflict and Spiritual Battle: Intersections between Religion and Politics among Brazilian Pentecostals 
by Carlos Gustavo Sarmet Moreira Smiderle and Wania Amelia Belchior Mesquita

A new interpretation of Evangelical actors’ increasing participation in Brazilian political and electoral contests is that elements of Pentecostalism predispose a believer to see the world as the site of an eternal struggle between God and Satan. The belief in demons that have territorial jurisdictions, known as territorial spirits, is one aspect of this theology. The cognitive universe of this belief induces the Evangelical voter to make electoral decisions on the basis of religious premises. It teaches the voter to conceive, without much reflection, the spiritual battle and the electoral game as territorial disputes.

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.


Friday, April 29, 2016

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient, #114
SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient #114 - 1985 to the Present:   Given what Carey and I saw on the ground in #Shanghai and #Suzhou, the use of force by the government and military seemed inevitable. Of course it was a terrible thing to do, but considering how large and widespread the demonstrations were, they were destabilizing the economy, and by doing what the government did in Beijing and broadcasting it on the news country-wide, they did NOT have to intervene significantly in any other cities. Everyone went home and back to work without further confrontations. When I say these things, Americans are quick to criticize me for not condemning the military response more strongly, but I think WE are quick to forget that our military shot students during a single university protest over a president - NO cities were shut down, our economy was not in peril. The good news is that nothing really stopped China's march toward increasing levels of democracy because it comes with their raging capitalism. AND, the generations sitting in this riverside cafe and walking along the esplanade of the new financial district that drives the economy are barely old enough to even remember the incident.Given what Carey and I saw on the ground in #Shanghai and #Suzhou, the use of force by the government and military seemed inevitable. Of course it was a terrible thing to do, but considering how large and widespread the demonstrations were, they were destabilizing the economy, and by doing what the government did in Beijing and broadcasting it on the news country-wide, they did NOT have to intervene significantly in any other cities. Everyone went home and back to work without further confrontations. When I say these things, Americans are quick to criticize me for not condemning the military response more strongly, but I think WE are quick to forget that our military shot students during a single university protest over a president - NO cities were shut down, our economy was not in peril. The good news is that nothing really stopped China's march toward increasing levels of democracy because it comes with their raging capitalism. AND, the generations sitting in this riverside cafe and walking along the esplanade of the new financial district that drives the economy are barely old enough to even remember the incident.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Shanghai

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
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Thursday, April 28, 2016

Welcome to SUZHOU, 1985 - to the present by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer 
Robert Glenn Ketchum.


Thursday, April 28, 2016

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present, #115
Suzhou #115:   I spent most of this day discussing business with my colleagues, #ZhangMeifang, her son #ZhangFan, and Dr. #HeShanan and in the course of that time we had an opulent lunch, a long tea, and now in the late afternoon we were walking to where we would have dinner. This peninsula onto a lake has numerous cafes, restaurants, and banquet halls, all connected by nicely groomed paths. Here in the warm light at the end of the day we are strolling toward a "floating" viewing pavilion to take in the view of the new metropolis of #Suzhou and the surrounding recently developed areas.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Suzhou

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
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Book, "Activist Scholarship and Urban Land Invasions" by Marc Becker

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By Marc Becker

SILK ROAD - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

Silk Road - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

The city of Suzhou, China, produced China's most beautiful silk and silk embroidery practiced by generational families for 3,000 years. My purpose in going to China starting in the mid-1980's was to turn my photographs into textiles, and this is my story. ~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Thursday, April 28, 2016

Silk Road - Embroideries #171
SILK ROAD #171:   The last two posts were close-up details to show-off the "negative space" design of the 3-panel, 2-sided, "Can't See The Trees For The Forest". This post and the next will take a step back to look at one entire panel in exactly the same framing, but illuminated in the two different ways shown in the detail shots. Here, with frontal lighting, you can see the amazing rhythm of the stitching that gives definition to the textures in the background meadow. Even within the hand-dyed black trunks which are transparent, they have the appearance of not only being opaque but you can also see they have mottled tones and are not all the "same" black.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Embroidery @WesCFA @RSSDesigns
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Wednesday, April 27, 2016

TATSHENSHINI: Saving a River Wild

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1990, I was invited on a 10-day float down the Tatshenshini, a huge river system flowing from Western Canada to the Pacific Ocean that literally divides two of North America's largest national parks, Canada's Kluane National Park and Alaska's Glacier Bay National Park. A gold mine was being proposed mid-river. I broke the story in LIFE magazine. There were many other articles and a book. The mine was never developed and the river is now a wilderness corridor. This is a conservation SUCCESS story!


Wednesday, April 27, 2016

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #99
TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #99:  The strange got even stranger! As the evening wore on, we realized there was a need to consume ALMOST ALL remaining groceries because we didn't want to fly anything edible or drinkable back, and there was only one more night beside this. To no ones surprise, it turned out we still had a considerable amount of alcohol, so the party was ON! And #MichaelHolmes (left) doesn't even drink! However, I suspect both of these characters were wasted because they were tired, and SO sunburned. OUCH! In case you're wondering if Patrick (right) is kinky - note his surgical gloves in the last post and this one - no he is NOT offering free anatomy exams! After days on the river, in the water, and pushing the oars of the heavy cargo boat, his hands were trashed so badly that his fingers were bleeding. So he covered his hands with Vaseline, and put on the gloves to revive them. He still had to paddle the cargo boat for one more day... and a VERY interesting day it would be!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Tatshenshini @glacierbaynps @Life @Wilderness #WeAreTheWild @nature_AK

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
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Abstract, "The Legacy of Liberation Theology in Colombia: The Defense of Life and Territory" by Leila Celis

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The Legacy of Liberation Theology in Colombia: The Defense of Life and Territory 
by Leila Celis

Liberation theology was very important in Latin America between 1970 and 1980. While it is less significant today, it has not disappeared. If we look at Colombia, we can see the pastoral and political commitment of the religious and the laity in various regions as they accompany marginalized communities, victims of government and parastatal violence, in conformity with their preferential option for the poor. Motivated by the crucified Christ, the heirs of liberation theology have developed a theology of life or of human rights. As human rights advocates, they identify among the causes of violence the policies of capitalist development, denounced as imperialist and responsible for the poverty of the majority of the population. This development has its origin in the parallel dynamics of social and international relations and the associated adaptation of the social movement.

NO PEBBLE MINE, Pictures from Ground Zero by Robert Glenn Ketchum


NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero 
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Thank you to the EPA for recognizing the value of the Bristol Bay fishery. 
NOW, what can we do to protect this habitat further? 
Mission:  To protect the national parks and national refuges of southwest Alaska, 
and the Bristol Bay fishery from the development of the Pebble mine, and other commercial risks.





Wednesday, April 27, 2016 

NO PEBBLE MINE #189, Pictures from Ground Zero:
NO PEBBLE MINE #189, Pictures from Ground Zero:  At last the rising terrain becomes pronounced and the #WoodMountains and #TikchikLakes come into view. The summits in the distance rise to 8,000-feet, and we will ultimately investigate that backcountry. But for now, notice in the landscape beneath the wing the number of small river valleys that have formed, flowing down out of the foothills. I count at least six different stream systems, and a small wetland/pond (lower, middle) in the scope of this view. Wilderness, fish, and numerous larger animals are EVERYWHERE out there. This is no place for the intrusions of industrial development. Southwest Alaska is a paradise of wilderness, clean air, clean water, and a billion-dollar-a-year fishery. Say NO TO THE PEBBLE MINE!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism Online:
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Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Where It All Began: LIMEKILN CREEK by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Where It All Began:  Limekiln Creek by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1967, I discovered Limekiln Creek on the Big Sur Coast in California. Among those redwoods, I had an epiphany as a young artist. As a photographer, most of the skills I would use, I would learn there. Many years later in a mature career, I helped the American Land Conservancy acquire this property for the California State Park system. This is the story of a very personal place.



Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Where It All Began:   Limekiln Creek, #17
Where It All Began:   Limekiln Creek, #17:  In any given season, the forests, streams, and pools of #Limekiln are also the repository of strange and wonderous "found" objects. This leaf was glowing so brightly as the sunlight shown off it, that I saw it from many feet away and thought it was a metallic object. When I got closer to observe what it really was, I noticed the leaf was also lying in a bed of golden sand that had settled into a depression on a sunken log. While that may not seem strange at first, consider that in all my visits to this area, and having clammered up every canyon and side-canyon into their headwaters, I NEVER saw an accumulation of golden sand ANYWHERE else. I never saw golden sand in ANY quantity elsewhere! How did this get here? What is the "ghost" leaf in the lower right corner? AND, why are the highlights in the creek flowing by in the upper right sparkling with prismatic colors?
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd, #LittleBearProd, ALC (@american_land), Monterey Pop Festival (@MontereyPopFest)
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Book, "A Contemporary Cuba Reader. The Revolution under Raúl Castro" Edited By Philip Brenner; Marguerite Rose Jiménez; John M. Kirk and William M. Leogrande

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Edited By Philip Brenner; Marguerite Rose Jiménez; John M. Kirk and William M. Leogrande