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Friday, July 29, 2016

The Daze of My Life: Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography

My Life in the Garden of Eden
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

As part of paying the bills in my professional career, I photographed a number of significant gardens. I helped create several pretty amazing ones as well. Some of these pictures have been published in various books, but most have never been seen. In this blog, I will show you all my best garden images AND discuss garden design.





Friday, July 29, 2016

My Life in the Garden of Eden, #4:
Garden of Eden, #4:  Not all Edens are equal, or at least they do not start that way. This is my current backyard in Manhattan Beach and as part of our California water-saving effort, I have killed off the lawn. The temporary space has been used for beer-pong (not me, my son) and over the course of this blog, I will attempt to create a garden here and explain my ideas for fire-resistant and drought-tolerant landscapes. To give you some sense of what this MIGHT eventually look like, next week I will post an image from the garden I created at my former home in Bel Air. When I began that one, VERY large sections of the terrain looked like this, but NOT after I was through.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Thursday, July 28, 2016

Book, "Cauca's Indigenous Movement in Southwestern Colombia Land, Violence, and Ethnic Identity" by Brett Troyan


Cauca's Indigenous Movement in Southwestern Colombia

Land, Violence, and Ethnic Identity

BRETT TROYAN


Lexington Books
Pages: 220 • Size: 6 1/2 x 9 3/8
978-1-4985-0228-3 • Hardback • June 2015 • $85.00 • (£54.95)
978-1-4985-0229-0 • eBook • June 2015 • $84.99 • (£54.95)

ABOUT THE BOOK

SILK ROAD - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

Silk Road - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

The city of Suzhou, China, produced China's most beautiful silk and silk embroidery practiced by generational families for 3,000 years. My purpose in going to China starting in the mid-1980's was to turn my photographs into textiles, and this is my story. ~Robert Glenn Ketchum






Thursday, July 28, 2016
Silk Road - Embroideries #184
SILK ROAD #184:   Besides being a spectacle of subtle color variations, this embroidery is also an orgy of stitches and textures. In this detail you can see the amazing intensity of stitching and the elaborate layering techniques that were being used to create visual depth. The ferns alone are strikingly rendered but when you look more closely you can see how they have been laboriously interwoven with the leaves and grass reeds. There is SO much layering being done with the fern fronds that just beneath the red/gold leaf in the center of this image, there is a "dark colors" stitched area that clearly appears to be well behind the foreground - down, under the bushes, into the tangle of the undergrowth.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Embroidery @WesCFA @RSSDesigns
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Wednesday, July 27, 2016

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.



Wednesday, July 27, 2016
 SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient, #127
SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient #127 - 1985 to the Present:   Same POV as the last post, just 25yrs later! In fact, the skyline has changed AGAIN since I was last in Shanghai and the newest and tallest building has been constructed since my visit. If you have read this blog, you recognize the Oriental Pearl Tower, but you might not notice the Jin Mao tower as it's prominence has been reduced by the upstart neighbors. It is directly in front of the taller Shanghai World Financial Center, and framed by two "lesser" buildings. For me these last two pictures are the "bookends" of this blog. They represent not only the first and last pictures I took, but taken together they encapsulate something epic to which I was a privileged witness - the rise of the new Shanghai! (Quite literally the "rise" judging from this image - LOL).
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Shanghai

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
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Tuesday, July 26, 2016

TATSHENSHINI: Saving a River Wild

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1990, I was invited on a 10-day float down the Tatshenshini, a huge river system flowing from Western Canada to the Pacific Ocean that literally divides two of North America's largest national parks, Canada's Kluane National Park and Alaska's Glacier Bay National Park. A gold mine was being proposed mid-river. I broke the story in LIFE magazine. There were many other articles and a book. The mine was never developed and the river is now a wilderness corridor. This is a conservation SUCCESS story!


Tuesday, July 26, 2016

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #112
TATSHENSHINI - Saving a River Wild, #112:  As the human chain laboriously moved the gear bags along the narrow shoreline, the guides worked long, cold minutes in the water edging the now-lighter boats toward the beach. Here, Patrick is thigh-deep, pulling. The others are using their feet and paddles to keep the VERY SHARP ice edges from puncturing a raft tube. We still needed to float several miles the next day to our pick-up point, and we were very aware that previously we already had a bottom ripped out of one boat, so we did not need another accident. 4 boats had to be nursed through these narrow passages, BUT after hours of work, they ALL reached the shore undamaged and so did the endless gear transfer line. Everyone was exhausted, and several of the guides had numb toes and feet, but there was plenty of driftwood on the shore for a drying, warming fire. Now all we had to do was build one, set up nine tents, and prep dinner. It was just after midnight! photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Tatshenshini @glacierbaynps @Life @Wilderness #WeAreTheWild  @nature_AK

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
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Book, "Oil in the Soil. The Politics of Paying to Preserve the Amazon" by Pamela L. Martin


Oil in the Soil

The Politics of Paying to Preserve the Amazon

PAMELA L. MARTIN


Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
Pages: 168 • Size: 6 x 9
978-1-4422-1128-5 • Hardback • July 2011 • $81.00 • (£54.95)
978-1-4422-1130-8 • eBook • August 2011 • $79.99 • (£52.95)

ABOUT THE BOOK

Monday, July 25, 2016

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Growing up my parents had a home near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was there that I learned to ski. Over many years I befriended members of the Decker Flat Climbing and Frisbee Club, with whom I had both life, and art-forming outdoor experiences. I had my camera, and these are my adventures.  Enjoy!!



Monday, July 25, 2016

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #12:
THE HIGHER YOU GET, THE HIGHER YOU GET - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #12:   These early, VERY minimalistic pictures set off an internal dialogue in me that would ultimately lead to one of my first published portfolios, "WINTERS: 1970-1980." What I saw in these images were the simple observations of snow and a snow covered environment. In virtually ALL the other images of winter I had seen exhibited or published, winter was a season - people skied through the snow-covered landscape in magazines, or the picture represented some quintessential view, like Ansel Adams' famous, "Clearing Winter Storm (Yosemite)." No one it seemed looked at the ESSENCE of the winter environment but rather just saw the obvious spectacle and the "setting." What I was seeing was more like a stunning palette of forms and colors that reminded me of Chinese brush-paintings and watercolors.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd
SOCIAL MEDIA by #LittleBearProd: http://www.LittleBearProd.com
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Exclusive,"Medidas extraordinarias de seguridad en El Salvador: ¿Pueden reducir la violencia en el país?" by Noemy Polanco and Harry E. Vanden

Medidas extraordinarias de seguridad en El Salvador:  ¿Pueden reducir la violencia en el país?

Por

Noemy Polanco

Y

Harry E. Vanden

Después de abandonar una tregua entre las pandillas que se negoció con la ayuda del gobierno del FMLN en 2012 la violencia en El Salvador aumento significativamente, los registros del nivel de muertes violentas se elevó hasta alcanzar cifras entre los 25 o 30 homicidios por día hasta llegar a más que 100 homicidios por 100,000, habitantes por ano haciendo el Salvador el país no en guerra más violento en el mundo. Los niveles de violencia han sido atribuidos a las maras, las pandillas Mara Salvatrucha (MS ó MS-13) y Barrio 18 (M 18Por ello el gobierno del FMLN, en turno hoy representado por el Presidente Salvador Sánchez Cerén, ha optado por implementar medidas extraordinarias en la búsqueda de reducir la violencia y desarticular las estructuras de crimen organizado en manos de grupos de pandillas.

Where It All Began: LIMEKILN CREEK by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Where It All Began:  Limekiln Creek by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1967, I discovered Limekiln Creek on the Big Sur Coast in California. Among those redwoods, I had an epiphany as a young artist. As a photographer, most of the skills I would use, I would learn there. Many years later in a mature career, I helped the American Land Conservancy acquire this property for the California State Park system. This is the story of a very personal place.



Monday, July 25, 2016

Where It All Began:  Limekiln Creek, #30
Where It All Began - Limekiln Creek, #30:  Bare with me and this shot one more time. As you can see this is a closer detail and it reveals two things - the face of the falls is covered with moss which, in turn, is constantly inundated by lime-rich water. In time, the moss calcifies, becoming white and hard and looking a bit like dripping candle wax or a stalactite. New, green moss grows on top. Watching the flow of water work through the moss could occupy an entire day. However, for the more adventurous the other unique aspect of this falls revealed here is the "secret" pool. Look at the right side of the falls where there appears to be a separate stream of water. If you follow it down you see that it disappears behind the sunny rock outcrop. There is a deep, small pool there that the water flows into AND the pool is 40ft of sheer, wet rock ABOVE the main pool. Sitting in there on a hot day was amazing, BUT GETTING INTO THE POOL took an act of faith. In the upper right corner of this image you can see the trunks of two trees that are growing right out of the rock wall. There is a rope around the base of the larger tree and it hangs down all the way to the lower pool, hidden in a crack in the rocks. If you know it is there and fish it out, you use it to "walk up" the rock face opposite the level of the small pool. Now, holding the rope tightly, your feet flat on the rock face and your body, hanging out nearly parallel to the water below in the lower pool, you RUN across the rock face toward the pool. At the last minute, near the end of the rope's reach, you release and plunge into the small pool. Now, getting down from this position is a WHOLE other story, especially if you have been UP THERE for TOO long.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd, #LittleBearProd, ALC (@american_land), Monterey Pop Festival (@MontereyPopFest)
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Thursday, July 21, 2016

Welcome to SUZHOU, 1985 - to the present by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer 
Robert Glenn Ketchum.


Thursday, July 28, 2016

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present, #128
Suzhou #128:  I am not exactly sure how they get the cherry trees to bloom this way, but it makes for a nice framing of some magnificent architecture. This pavilion has been meticulously restored and is a spectacular example of multi-story engineering as an art form. I love the grace of the up-curving corners of the roofline, and the extensive wood moldings and carved details. In the steaming heat of the summer, it is also cooler in the central hall - probably a great place to lounge and listen to local female singers renowned for their unique voices and styles, whose singing was said to "relax and refresh."
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Suzhou

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
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