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Friday, July 3, 2015

Traveling in CHINA Since 1985 by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Traveling in CHINA Since 1985 by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. Earthwatch was one organization that allowed foreigners to visit China without going through too much red-tape. These photographs are a first glimpse into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum. 


Friday, July 3, 2015

Traveling in China Since 1985, #138
CHINA #138:   In 1986, #LakeTaihu was a rural -- and rather idyllic -- quiet countryside. Surrounded by a few small villages, the shores were mostly agricultural fields, busy with farmers going about their daily chores. The lake had hundreds of small fish farms whose owners often lived nearby onshore, or quite literally, in boats tied-up next to the fish pens. When boat traffic did ply the water, is was usually craft such as you see here:  low profile, and probably running on a sputtering single stroke engine. Many boats didn't even have that much, and they were simply paddled, or sailed. This is NOT #LakeHavasu at #EasterBreak. Well... at least not yet!

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Suzhou


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SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.


Friday, July 3, 2015


SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient, #71
SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient #71 - 1985 to the Present:  In my previous post I referenced walking around the “new” #Shanghai as being like being on another planet. So, put yourself in my shoes:  I'm alone; I speak virtually no Chinese; I can't read Chinese; and then I come upon this! Where am I, and what is going on here? Suddenly I realized the rising #Pudong district was NOT a new financial zone. In actuality it was a spaceport being secretly constructed to LOOK like a business district!!! At this moment I've stumbled into the flying saucer construction area, and it's now perfectly clear to me that the #JinMaoTower is an alien rocket ship. Holy cow, that is where I'm staying! Well, I guess that would better explain the bar at night....
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Shanghai

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TELL THE PEBBLE PARTNERSHIP TO CALL IT QUITS

The fight to stop the Pebble Mine goes on -- but the battlefront has moved from the U.S. EPA to the courtroom and beyond as we escalate massive nationwide pressure on Northern Dynasty Minerals, the last company standing behind the disastrous venture, to call it quits.

Over the last two weeks, NRDC ran a series of hard-hitting, full-page print ads in Washington urging the Pebble Partnership -- Northern Dynasty's legal entity -- to walk away from Pebble Mine. The EPA has confirmed that this gargantuan open-pit, gold and copper operation -- along with its estimated 10 billion tons of toxic mining waste -- carries catastrophic risk for Bristol Bay, its world-class salmon fishery, its pristine environment and its people.

Thursday, July 2, 2015

Welcome to SUZHOU, 1985 - to the present by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer 
Robert Glenn Ketchum.




Thursday, July 2, 2015

Welcome to Suzhou, 1985 - to the present, #72
Suzhou #72:   So, the exhibit, “CHINA: Fifty Years Inside The People’s Republic” closed in Hong Kong, the edits were made, and then the somewhat smaller exhibit shipped to the recently opened #Shanghai Museum for its big premier “inside” mainland China. I was excited because I was planning to attend the opening. And I was eager to invite Zhang Meifang to see another side of my photography (in a museum setting) “honoring” the very city in which she lived and worked; images I had made during the time I was collaborating with her. Michael Hoffman, CEO of @ApertureFdn, and organizer of the exhibit and publication, notified all of the edited artists as to what had been removed. So I was surprised when he actually called me. Michael was also quite surprised because he had to inform me that EVERY SINGLE PICTURE OF MINE HAD BEEN EDITED OUT OF THE SHOW! I was stunned, and asked why that would happen? His reply was a phrase I had heard before in reference to another edited artist’s work. “These pictures are of an unhappy time which no one wishes to remember.” WOW! Talk about controlling the minds of the next generation….
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Suzhou

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SILK ROAD - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

Silk Road - Embroideries of Robert Glenn Ketchum

The city of Suzhou, China, produced China's most beautiful silk and silk embroidery practiced by generational families for 3,000 years. My purpose in going to China starting in the mid-1980's was to turn my photographs into textiles, and this is my story. ~Robert Glenn Ketchum


Thursday, July 2, 2015
Silk Road - Embroideries #128
SILK ROAD #128:   Traditional #Chinese #embroidery often included themes / subjects that were regularly repeated because they were showcases for tour de force embroidery #stitching. Some subjects, such as dogs and cats, were way overdone. And in reality, most of those were “training” exercises created by younger #embroiderers still honing their skills. Other subjects were rendered by master embroiderers to define how “good” THEIR #guild work was. The peacock was one of those subjects. It was said that a peacock feather embroidered onto the robe of a high administrator was so realistic that the embroidery could not be distinguished from an actual feather. One of the best of these peacocks (pictured here) was on display in the special "museum" room at the institute, and was SO striking that we included it in the “Threads of Light” exhibit at the @UCLA @FowlerMuseum. The red / black floral background is not too shabby, either!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Embroidery @WesCFA @RSSDesigns
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Wednesday, July 1, 2015

TATSHENSHINI: Saving a River Wild

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild by Robert Glenn Ketchum

In 1990, I was invited on a 10-day float down the Tatshenshini, a huge river system flowing from Western Canada to the Pacific Ocean that literally divides two of North America's largest national parks, Canada's Kluane National Park and Alaska's Glacier Bay National Park. A gold mine was being proposed mid-river. I broke the story in LIFE magazine. There were many other articles and a book. The mine was never developed and the river is now a wilderness corridor. This is a conservation SUCCESS story!


Wednesday, July 1, 2015

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #56
TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #56:  The pilots intended to go up-and-over the coastal range to reach the #Tatshenshini corridor. So, as we gained elevation, I got one last remarkable look at the #AlsekRiver as it wound its way across the #YakutatForelands to the #Pacific. This image demonstrates the danger of floating a river of this size. If you recall, earlier in this blog (posts #14-16), I told the story of the catastrophic morning “mistake” that threw #CeliaHunter into the Tat, and nearly drowned one of our guides. That incident came about because our “cargo” raft was almost pulled down the “wrong” braid in the river by the strong current. At river level, it's often difficult to tell which is the “right” braid.  The wrong one may ground, or trap, a boat. Look at the meandering confusion in the upper-third of this image (which we floated through). Even from this “eagle’s view” it's difficult to recognize the “right” braid. THIS is where the experience of a river guide is essential. Thank you to our excellent guide, Dick Rice, for keeping it a GREAT trip for all!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Tatshenshini @glacierbaynps @Life @Wilderness #WeAreTheWild @nature_AK

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NO PEBBLE MINE, Pictures from Ground Zero by Robert Glenn Ketchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero 
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Thank you to the EPA for recognizing the value of the Bristol Bay fishery. 
NOW, what can we do to protect this habitat further? 
Mission: To protect the national parks and national refuges of southwest Alaska, 
and the Bristol Bay fishery from the development of the Pebble mine, and other commercial risks.



Wednesday, July 1, 2015 

NO PEBBLE MINE #146, Pictures from Ground Zero:
NO PEBBLE MINE #146, Pictures from Ground Zero:   Purple-tounged and completely pigged-out on blueberries, we stumbled down to the rocky beach, and ambled back to camp. Food prep started immediately because we all needed to re-energize. As the evening wore on, the wind picked up again, so out came more layers of clothing. Inside our “cocoons” of #Capilene, fleece, and shells, the food kicked in and warmth flooded back into our bodies (TY, @Patagonia and @HellyHansen – I was groovin’). We were definitely tired, and a bit sore from the long day’s walk, but the wind was blowing the storm to pieces of the peaks and the basin was putting on a light show. In one last glorious hurrah for the day, we found a big patch of spongy tundra facing the lake and lay down to watch the “special effects.” The FANTASTIC visuals were accompanied by sense-around sound as well. First we would hear gusts coming from up in the summits behind the second lake.They would then stream toward us across the water, bluster about our camp shaking tree branches and rain-flys, only to scuttle off and down the outlet of the #ChilikadrotnaRiver (to the left in this image.) It was QUITE a concert.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

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Tuesday, June 30, 2015

TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

TRACY ARM WILDERNESS - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time by Robert Glenn Ketchum

To celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act (#Wilderness), this new blog focuses on a wilderness area in the #Tongass rainforest of southeast Alaska. This is the tale of a 10-day kayak trip - a testament to WHY wilderness is important, by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.





Tuesday, June 30, 2015

TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #45
TRACY ARM Wilderness - An Alaskan Kayak "Trip" Through Time, #45:  Finally somewhat ice-free, we paddled along the shoreline of the small bay to find a rock strewn BEACH that was approachable. It had probably been created by a VERY substantial river pouring out of a side-cut valley. We had missed this entirely in our journey up the #fjord, because this beach wasn't visible from our paddling position.  Once again, scale is EVERYTHING! After setting up camp, I got back in my kayak to make this image. The river comes in from a sizable valley that is barely visible. Note the dark “notch” that angles up and to the right, at the top of the whitewater falls coming down to the beach.  That is the valley! Also, note the dark edge of the shoreline.  That's kelp, still exposed, as the tide hasn't crested yet. What is barely noticeable is another band of greenish rocks, above the dark line of seaweed. That line is where the high-tide stops. Check out how close to our “kitchen” the water will come! Something else you can't see here are the smaller “arms” of the river, which flow in, around, and through our encampment. We considered camping on the hill above the tents, however, the scrub was so dense there wasn't any place for our tents. So instead, we found ourselves flirting with the incoming tide, hoping it didn't rain harder, and cause the river to swell!
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2015, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd @Wilderness #Wilderness #Tongass

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Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Saying Goodbye to Bobby Andrew, Defender of Bristol Bay by Joel Reynolds

Saying Goodbye to Bobby Andrew, Defender of Bristol Bay
by Joel Reynolds, Western Director and Senior attorney, NRDC, Los Angeles

I didn't expect the Pebble Mine would outlast Bobby Andrew. He was a fighter who never seemed to get tired. Over 70 years old, and he was always willing to make the trip - whatever the trip, wherever it took him -- to talk, to testify, to tell the terrible story of the uniquely reckless scheme by international mining giants to poison the communities and wild salmon fisheries of Alaska's Bristol Bay with a gigantic copper and gold mine.

photograph © copyright, Natural Resources Defense Council 2015@NRDC @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd 

Monday, May 25, 2015

Research Journal about Latin America Expands Digital Presence: Latin American Perspectives based at UC Riverside, has international reach

Research Journal about Latin America Expands Digital Presence 
Latin American Perspectives based at the University of California Riverside, has international reach

RIVERSIDE, Calif. – Latin American Perspectives, a bimonthly journal now in its 43rd year, is reaching out with a new website, latinamericanperspectives.com, and expansion of social media.

With its editorial offices on the University of California, Riverside, campus, LAP distributes to some 8,000 subscribers, including 2,300 institutions scattered around the world, especially in the United States and Latin America. It is considered one of the leading journals on Latin American studies.

Among its 110 editors are UCR scholars Ronald Chilcote; Edward A. Dickson, Emeritus Professor of Economics and Political Science; Jennifer Hughes, associate professor of history; Jonathan Ritter, associate professor of music; and Latin American librarian, Rhonda Neugebauer.

Our emphasis on a powerful website and active social media is unique for an academic journal, but it is also important in drawing a large readership of researchers, students, and the general public into a deeper understanding of the rapidly changing events in Latin America,” said Chilcote, the journal’s managing editor.

The journal publishes primarily in English, but blog entries on the website appear in English, Spanish or Portuguese.

The new website and social media effort are being launched in conjunction with the XXXIII International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association May 27 to 30 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The website was designed by Charles Murray, CMM Studio of Laguna Beach, and the comprehensive social media by RR Bernet, Little Bear Productions in San Francisco.