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Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Weekly Post, NO PEBBLE MINE: Pictures from Ground Zero by Robert Glenn Ketchum

NO PEBBLE MINE Pictures from Ground Zero
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

 
Since 1998, I have been working to protect the spectacular resources of southwest Alaska and the fishery of Bristol Bay. Two Aperture books, a national traveling exhibition, a massive coalition of concerned users, and a lot of personal lobbying, had it looking like we were almost there. Then Donald Trump took office claiming he would always put America, and American jobs first. SO WHY destroy a BILLION-dollar-a-year, RENEWABLE salmon fishery and over 100,000 jobs for a group of international mineral speculators that will leave us with a Superfund site to clean up, and NO fishery left edible? And yet, he did,..so please, keep saying NO TO THE PEBBLE MINE!
~Robert Glenn Ketchum






Tuesday, May 21, 2019 

NO PEBBLE MINE #349, Pictures from Ground Zero
NO PEBBLE MINE #349:  The ADF&G cabin that my ranger/hosts reside in, is by Alaskan standards, very “skookum,” - well made, and well appointed. There is a stunning stash of food goods, much weaponry, maps are everywhere, and the stove makes it all quite toasty. As on the Goodnews, not far from their cabin is a lichen-covered meadow, where they suggest I pitch my tent, so I set up immediately, while they prepare an evening meal. The difference between this camp, and the one on the Goodnews is scale. Here I have a lot more room to wander, and so I do. I can walk all over the place, and it affords me some great vantage points on the river. Just before I am called back to the cabin for our evening meal, the sun begins to set, and the sky goes off. These river camps have truly given me some incredible evening displays, and I take this one as a good sign of the days to come. In the morning we will start towards the headwaters, but for now, some food and sleep will do just fine.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd @NRDC @OrvisFlyFishing #NoPebbleMine #LittleBearProd

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Weekly Post: THE TONGASS: Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees by Robert Glenn Ketchum

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees
by Robert Glenn Ketchum
In 1985, I began a 2-year commission to explore the Tongass rainforest, the largest forest in the United States Forest Service (USFS) system AND the largest temperate rainforest in the world. It was a unique, old-growth environment under siege from industrial logging. The resulting investigative book I published helped to pass the Tongass Timber Reform Bill, protect 1,000,000 acres of old-growth, and create 11 new wilderness areas. This is the story of how that was achieved.




Tuesday, May 21, 2019

THE TONGASS:  Stop the Cut, There are Salmon in the Trees, #143:
THE TONGASS, #143:   We linger with Stan (Price) the Bear Man at Pack Creek awhile longer, but we have miles to go (paddle) before we sleep, so our group must get on with the rest of our day. The rain has stopped, and the sky actually seems to be clearing, so we return to our canoes and launch ourselves once again, heading south, down the Seymour Canal. Within an hour or so, the sun breaks out of the clouds, and it appears we are going to have a really nice day. Thus, we paddle, and paddle on! It actually gets HOT because of the effort we are exerting. The Tongass is a temperate rainforest, but it is also the northern-most forests in the world to claim this, so “temperate” means most days are in the 60’s, at best. However, when the sun comes out, the “real” Alaskans come out as well, and our guide, Jeff Sloss, is the first to strip off his shirt and paddle “topless.” The other significant factor (as far as I am concerned) of this Alaskan rainforest in the summer months, is the astounding, predatory insect population, ONSHORE. Most visitors spend much of their time wearing full clothing, and mosquito head nets for protection. One of the delightful advantages of being offshore, paddling in the canoes, is that there are VERY FEW insects once you get away from the shoreline, Hence, when our party stops for a rest, we always do so at islands and rock outcrops, in the middle of the canal, where we can snack and rest without an insect assault. After a long morning paddle, that is exactly what we do, when we stop for lunch. Philip also decides to go “topless” now, and for more than 1hr., we are all eating, fishing, and clamming. I want to point out the gentleman (upper, right) looking at the camera with his hand extended. He is old-school, part of the Sierra Club group, and from the first night in camp, he has made it clear he believes Philip, Carey, and I are “suspect,” because we are wearing “weird” (Patagonia) clothing, and he thinks, that without wool, etc., we are at risk. Funny he says things like that and then dons a cotton flannel shirt, which when wet in cold weather, is like wearing a hypothermic jacket. His choice of clothing also adds about eight extra pounds to his pack. He will have more to whine about shortly, when he views our Mole Harbor Royal Catacanoe Club Regatta.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Monday, May 20, 2019

Weekly Post, High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers

High and Wild: Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers
by Robert Glenn Ketchum

After receiving my MFA from CalArts, I was invited by Bill Lund, Sharon Disney’s husband, to come stay at the families' Diamond-D Ranch in Dubois, Wyoming. Bill thought I might like to photograph in the nearby Wind River Mountains, which I did, backpacking through them extensively over the next three summers. Welcome to a world of big granite walls and huge alpine lakes!





Monday, May 20, 2019

High and Wild:  Three Years of Wandering in the Wind Rivers, #91:
Wind River, #91:  Having established an excellent location for our campsite at the head of the 11,000ft. Titcomb Lakes basin, Vicki Golden, our companion, Michael Knowlin, and I, have a great dinner, a star-filled sky, and a restful, weather-free night of sleep to help us recover from our long, all-day, uphill backpack. When we wake, the day is once again, COOL and with little evidence of incoming weather. Normally, after such a long hike in yesterday, this would be a day of relaxing in camp to recover, but we are so excited by the good conditions and this amazing place, we are just the opposite - we are pumped-up to go out on a long ramble around the basin. Having been here the previous summer, Vicki and I know what a spectacular walk-around this will be, and Michael is on board to explore, so with daypacks full of gear and food, we have an early morning launch, and begin to traverse the basin. As the day wears on, a breeze picks up, but it remains sunny, and the basin full of lakes is sparkling like a jewel. Knowlin is blown away! About midday, we near the end of the last big lake in the basin, where we plan to stop for lunch. As we descend to lakeshore for that meal, I take this shot of Vicki, the skyline crowned with the ragged spires of Mt. Sacagawea, behind her. What a place! What a day! A great lunch is had by all, and my black lab, Belle Star, takes a long swim in the lake, apparently exploring it.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Weekly Post: The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get by Robert Glenn Ketchum

by Robert Glenn Ketchum


Growing up my parents had a home near Sun Valley, Idaho. It was there that I learned to ski. Over many years I befriended members of the Decker Flats Climbing and Frisbee Club, with whom I had both life, and art-forming outdoor experiences. I had my camera, and these are my adventures.  Enjoy!!  ~Robert Glenn Ketchum



Monday, May 20, 2019

The Higher You Get, The Higher You Get - Sun Valley and the DFC&FC, #159: DFCFC, #159:  Gordon Williams has opted for an afternoon solo ski to a high point, to have look at the summits around us, and an overview of our entire Hyndman-Cobb basin. Most of us are still in our encampment, finishing lunch and getting gear together for an afternoon tour, but it is hard to keep our eyes off of his dramatic ascent across the base slopes of Hyndman. His traverse line soon carries him well above the tracks left from Chris Dupont’s previous ascent/descent of these slopes (previous post, and #151). Even though Gordon is now in some very extreme territory, he is relatively safe from danger of avalanche. Following his climb, Jennifer finally asks the inevitable question, “Where is Gordy going?” Pondering that question, it is clear to me what he intends. From where he is, he can look back and upwards to see Hyndman, and that is Cobb Peak in front of him in this image, but from his POV, Old Hyndman is still out-of-view, and Gordon wants to see it all. Knowing that, I determine he is headed for the rocks, in hopes he can navigate around the corner which will give him the full, 360˙ reveal. I also realize that from where I am, I will loose site of him, so I strap on my skis, grab my camera and big lenses, and take a little ski out on my own into the basin, so that I can keep him in site, even if he does go around the corner of the rocky ridge.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Sunday, May 19, 2019

The 40th Anniversary of Venice Family Clinic Art Walk & Auction

The 40th Anniversary of Venice Family Clinic Art Walk & Auction will be held on Sunday, May 19, 2019 at Google Los Angeles.


"Say No To The Pebble Mine"
by Robert Glenn Ketchum
26” x 36”
photograph, LexJet Metallic photographic print, face-mounted on 1/4” plexiglass to hang as is, 2019


This annual event brings thousands of artists, art enthusiasts and collectors together to help raise over $850,000 to help provide high-quality comprehensive health care to 27,000 low-income, homeless, undocumented, and otherwise uninsured people. Nearly fifty years ago, we started with one clinic in Venice. Thanks to our dedicated artists and patrons, the clinic has now expanded to 12 sites in Venice, Santa Monica, Mar Vista, Inglewood, and Culver City – as well as street outreach to homeless populations from the Westside of Los Angeles to Downtown LA.


Friday, May 17, 2019

Weekly Post, "The Daze of My Life: Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography"

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography


Biographies are studies of someone's life based on cumulative research. Good ones may reveal something, but probably barely scratch the surface of what actually went on. The internet is allowing me to do something VERY different. 
~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Friday, May 17, 2019

The Daze of My Life:  Robert Glenn Ketchum, An Autobiography #148: Daze, #148:  Having never been through a New England spring, I do not expect it to be as colorful as the fall, but it is, perhaps even moreso. The image above is not a fall shot, but rather the vibrancy of spring. While working on the Lila Acheson Wallace Funds commission in the Hudson Valley, I have made some unexpected, and significant friends. One of those who has purchased prints from me is Laurance Rockefeller, and he and other family members live in an expansive compound of houses and gardens in Pocantico Hills. The historic home Kykuit is there as well, and none of this is open to the public, as yet. Through I series of contacts and persuasive letters, Laurance allows me to photograph the grounds, gardens, golf course, and Kykuit, but asks that I not make images of the private homes or their locations. Happy to be invited, I frequently visit and shoot. Nearby Tarrytown is also historic, and has lovely homes and neighborhoods, so I often pass through it when I visit Kykuit. On this especially rainy day, I decide to drive through the spectacular Tarrytown Cemetery, which is in an explosion of spring bloom. Again, from the roof of my van, with my 4x5 camera, I shoot this, “A Sympathy of Things,” another new image that would eventually be included in my forthcoming portfolio, and also in my first Aperture book, The Hudson River and The Highlands.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019 
@RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Weekly Post, "Fish Farms: Forming My World View Through Aquaculture in 1977" by Robert Glenn Ketchum

Fish Farms:  Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977
by Robert Glenn Ketchum



In 1977, I was commissioned by Elisabeth Mann Borgese to help do research, interviews, and take photographs for a book she was writing about worldwide aquaculture. It would be published by Harry N. Abrams, one of the world’s premier publishing houses, famous for their beautiful books. It would also involve around-the-world travel to 8 countries, and some of the most remarkable places I would ever visit. SEAFARM: The Story of Aquaculture was a very successful publication featuring over 100 of my images, and an exhibit I assembled with support from Nikon, became a Smithsonian traveling exhibition for 6-yrs., viewed by over 6-million people.  ~Robert Glenn Ketchum




Friday, May 17, 2019

FISHFARMS:  Forming My World View through Aquaculture in 1977, #56:
Fish Farms #56:  Still some miles from Madras, Elisabeth and I have stopped to view a community involved in commercial agriculture and fish farming. They are a community of boat people that live entirely on their boats, and although there are grains sheds here and there, there are very few houses in this landscape. These people are noticeably poor, but work hard to raise and harvest agricultural crops off of the land, which they then take to market in their boats. In between the agricultural fields are a few fish ponds that hosts carp, and these ponds and their fish, provide the community with their principle protein. The sun is hot, the soil is hard, and the work is even harder. There is NO mechanical support to be seen anywhere. Everything is done by hand, and hard labor. In the image above, two boys convey water from a canal to their field without using any pumps. Under the supervision of the older man, these two have a continuous, rhythmic, dip-and-swing action, that scoops water from the canal, and flings it into the irrigation channel in the field. The more perfectly they perform the task, the less water is spilled. These two are very good at this method, but imagine doing this for hours on end, under a BLAZING sun. Until this visit to India, I have never seen such a physically, labor-intensive society. My trip has barely begun, and already I have seen things I could never have imagined. This is going to be a very informative journey for me, and soon we head for Thailand.

photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2019, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd

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Monday, May 6, 2019

NRDC to World Bank: “Location, Community, and Climate-Smart”

May 06, 2019

by Joel Reynolds,
Western Director, Senior Attorney, Marine Mammals, Oceans Division, Nature Program

At last week’s launch of World Bank’s Climate-Smart Mining Facility, NRDC elevates importance of place and community, citing reckless Pebble Mine as poster child for “wrong mine, wrong place.” Last Wednesday in Washington, D.C., I was pleased to attend a gathering at the World Bank accompanying the launch of its climate-smart mining initiative—a public-private initiative based on the imperative that the realities of climate change and the accelerating transition to a green energy economy must become a central focus of present and future decision-making in the global mining sector.

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