Shop Sundance Catalog

icon icon

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Earth To Pebble Mine: Stay Away From Bristol Bay. World Conservation Congress Registers Overwhelming International Opposition to Mega-Mine That Threatens Bristol Bay’s Wild Salmon Fishery by Joel Reynolds


Earth To Pebble Mine: Stay Away From Bristol Bay. World Conservation Congress Registers Overwhelming International Opposition to Mega-Mine That Threatens Bristol Bay’s Wild Salmon Fishery

by Joel Reynolds,
Western Director and Senior Attorney, NRDC, Los Angeles

A new chapter opened today in the battle against the proposed Pebble Mine, as the World Conservation Congress overwhelmingly adopted a motion opposing the embattled mega-mine and other large-scale mining in the Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska and urging the U.S. government to prevent the issuance of permits. With this action, an international body has for the first time formally joined longstanding opposition to the massive copper and gold project — a project that, for years, has been the focus of a relentless, broad-based campaign in Alaska and the lower 48 states to stop it.

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

TATSHENSHINI: Saving a River Wild

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild by Robert Glenn Ketchum


In 1990, I was invited on a 10-day float down the Tatshenshini, a huge river system flowing from Western Canada to the Pacific Ocean that literally divides two of North America's largest national parks, Canada's Kluane National Park and Alaska's Glacier Bay National Park. A gold mine was being proposed mid-river. I broke the story in LIFE magazine. There were many other articles and a book. The mine was never developed and the river is now a wilderness corridor. This is a conservation SUCCESS story!



Tuesday, August 16, 2016

TATSHENSHINI:  Saving a River Wild, #115
TATSHENSHINI - Saving a River Wild, #115:  Looking back at where we had come from on the previous evening, you can see that there is some open water close to the shore. It is very shallow here, so the larger bergs ground before reaching this point. The ice that is here is small enough that most of it can be pushed around and thus the guides have gone back into the water to pull the rafts through and around the obstacles in these shallows, and get them over to the open water of the outflowing Alsek river below the massive ice jam. Once again our collective camp trudges the gear across the broad beach to where the boats will be reloaded. Having finished that, most of us are pondering our last views of this place and I am marveling that we made it at all. Again, scale fails me, BUT that blue berg is the size of a small house. It, and those really dirty ones on either side, have completely sealed off ANY path through where we past last night. As we would eventually learn, the next six river float groups to follow during the ensuing week had to be picked up by helicopter from the bar where we had our late lunch. There was NO passage through this to the outlet and no one could float on to the airstrip pick-up.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #Tatshenshini @glacierbaynps @Life @Wilderness #WeAreTheWild  @nature_AK
Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
____________________________________________________

Book, "The Topsy-Turvy Path to Twenty-first-Century Socialism The Limitations of the New Left in Latin America" by Nicole Fabricant


The Topsy-Turvy Path to Twenty-first-Century Socialism. The Limitations of the New Left in Latin America 
by Nicole Fabricant

Book Review of:
Latin America’s Turbulent Transitions: The Future of Twenty-first-Century Socialism.
by Roger Burbach, Michael Fox, Federico Fuentes
London and New York: Zed Books, 2013.

Monday, August 15, 2016

Abstract, Latin American Studies: Publishing and Politics by Ronaldo Munck

:::::: Abstract ::::::

Latin American Studies: Publishing and Politics 
by Ronaldo Munck

This is an opportune moment, I believe, to debate the future of Latin American studies journals, given their variety and well-established nature. My own standpoint derives from a long-term membership of the Latin American Perspectives advisory panel and a brief stint as chief editor of the Bulletin of Latin American Research (UK) as well as membership of around a dozen editorial boards of journals dedicated to labor and globalization studies. And, of course, as has any other active researcher I have faced the demands made by the powers that be on where we should publish and what we should publish.

Friday, August 12, 2016

Abstract, A View from the North by Rory M. Miller

:::::: Abstract ::::::

A View from the North 
by Rory M. Miller

Having spent a significant part of my career editing the two major interdisciplinary journals on Latin America published in the United Kingdom, I have thought for years about what our role as editors should be in terms of linking different traditions of Latin American studies—North American, European (in all their various national guises), and Latin American (again, in all their various national guises). There were clear differences between the two journals. The Bulletin of Latin American Research was the journal of the (UK) Society for Latin American Studies, so one could envisage the “typical” reader as one of the 200 or so who attended annual conferences; the Journal of Latin American Studies, one of the two or three leaders internationally in the field, presented different challenges, since its readership was much broader and its reach much more global, evident in the fact that roughly 40 percent of submissions came from North America. (I should emphasize here that what follows is my personal view, not that of my editorial colleagues or the publisher of either journal.)

In the end I would hope that the Journal of Latin American …

CLICK TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Latin American Perspectives
July 2016 vol. 43 no. 4 Abstract, pages 116-118

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Abstract, The Clash of Political Paradigms in Twenty-first-Century Latin America and the Response of Area-Study Journals by Steve Ellner

:::::: Abstract ::::::

The Clash of Political Paradigms in Twenty-first-Century Latin America and the Response of Area-Study Journals 
by Steve Ellner

The relationship between state and society, particularly with regard to social movements and organizations, constitutes an important paradigmatic gap separating the experiences of Latin American and U.S. democracies and represents a challenge to area-study programs, including academic journals. These differences manifest themselves in major ways today as a result of the rise to power of leftist and center-leftist movements, as they also did in the past on different fronts. U.S. labor leaders, for instance, steeped in the tradition of Samuel Gompers who envisioned organized labor’s political role as that of a pressure group, have always felt uncomfortable with the political party affiliations of their Latin American counterparts. This line of thinking, which rests on the separation of social movements and the state, is reflected in the U.S. scholarly literature on organized labor in the region. Latin American trade unionists, on the other hand, justify the nexus by pointing to the supportive role played by parties during military dictatorships when many labor leaders are forced to go underground or into exile.

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient by Robert Glenn Ketchum

During the reign of Mao (1949-1976), China was a closed country. China in the 1980’s was 80% rural, with no outside visitors, particularly from the West. When China opened to travelers, the Chinese government placed severe limitations on who was allowed to enter the country. These photographs are a continuation of other ongoing blog threads of the first glimpses into China in the mid-1980’s by world-renowned Conservation Photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum.




Wednesday, August 10, 2016

 SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient, #129
SHANGHAI, OZ of the Orient #129 - 1985 to the Present:   This is my final post for this blog. I hope you will continue to follow SILK ROAD, however, as that blog is about the creation of the work that brought me to China in the first place. It has now been 4 years since my last visit and I miss the "emerald towers" of OZ; the strange energy of the streets; the amazing diversity of food; the crazy signage - and so much more. I hope those of you that have followed these blogs about China have enjoyed seeing this evolution of 30yrs. through my eyes. It is not typical to the work for which my career has become known, BUT I WAS THERE and in some degree just became a witness with a camera. Watching the stunning transition of this country was a privilege and I would like to thank UCLA for helping me to become the first American artist to enter the China Exchange Program.
photograph(s) © copyright, ROBERT GLENN KETCHUM, 2016, @RbtGlennKetchum @LittleBearProd #LittleBearProd #China #Shanghai

Follow Robert Glenn Ketchum's Photographic Activism & Art Online:
____________________________________________________

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Book, "Contemporary Middle Class in Latin America A Study of San Felipe" by Omar Pereyra

Contemporary Middle Class in Latin America:  A Study of San Felipe

OMAR PEREYRA


In the last decades, the Latin American middle class is growing in size while becoming more heterogeneous. Sustained economic growth explains its increasing size, but behind its heterogeneity there is not only the diversification of lifestyles, but also the crystallization of a large process of upward social mobility of second and third generation migrants to capital cities and their incorporation into middle-class positions. In the last decades, these individuals are now part of the different spheres of socialization formerly occupied by the traditional middle class: private schools, college and universities, middle-class jobs and occupations, and traditional middle-class neighborhoods.

Monday, August 8, 2016

Abstract, Publishing in International, Peer-reviewed Social Science Journals: Implications for Latin American Studies by Carmen Diana Deere

:::::: Abstract ::::::

Publishing in International, Peer-reviewed Social Science Journals Implications for Latin American Studies 
by Carmen Diana Deere

The Bolivian Platform against Climate Change is a coalition of civil society and social movement organizations working to address the effects of global warming in Bolivia and to influence the global community. Many of the organizations use indigenous philosophy and worldviews to contest normative conceptions of development. A study of the growth of this movement drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in 2010 reveals a complex relationship between state and nonstate actors that has had a striking impact on the global community despite the failure of multilateral climate change negotiations.

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Exclusive,"Medidas extraordinarias de seguridad en El Salvador: ¿Pueden reducir la violencia en el país?" by Noemy Polanco and Harry E. Vanden

Medidas extraordinarias de seguridad en El Salvador: 
¿Pueden reducir la violencia en el país?

Por

Noemy Polanco

Y

Harry E. Vanden

Después de abandonar una tregua entre las pandillas que se negoció con la ayuda del gobierno del FMLN en 2012 la violencia en El Salvador aumento significativamente, los registros del nivel de muertes violentas se elevó hasta alcanzar cifras entre los 25 o 30 homicidios por día hasta llegar a más que 100 homicidios por 100,000, habitantes por ano haciendo el Salvador el país no en guerra más violento en el mundo. Los niveles de violencia han sido atribuidos a las maras, las pandillas Mara Salvatrucha (MS ó MS-13) y Barrio 18 (M 18).Por ello el gobierno del FMLN, en turno hoy representado por el Presidente Salvador Sánchez Cerén, ha optado por implementar medidas extraordinarias en la búsqueda de reducir la violencia y desarticular las estructuras de crimen organizado en manos de grupos de pandillas.

Exclusive,"Medidas extraordinarias de seguridad en El Salvador: ¿Pueden reducir la violencia en el país?" by Noemy Polanco and Harry E. Vanden

Medidas extraordinarias de seguridad en El Salvador: 
¿Pueden reducir la violencia en el país?

Por

Noemy Polanco

Y

Harry E. Vanden

Después de abandonar una tregua entre las pandillas que se negoció con la ayuda del gobierno del FMLN en 2012 la violencia en El Salvador aumento significativamente, los registros del nivel de muertes violentas se elevó hasta alcanzar cifras entre los 25 o 30 homicidios por día hasta llegar a más que 100 homicidios por 100,000, habitantes por ano haciendo el Salvador el país no en guerra más violento en el mundo. Los niveles de violencia han sido atribuidos a las maras, las pandillas Mara Salvatrucha (MS ó MS-13) y Barrio 18 (M 18).Por ello el gobierno del FMLN, en turno hoy representado por el Presidente Salvador Sánchez Cerén, ha optado por implementar medidas extraordinarias en la búsqueda de reducir la violencia y desarticular las estructuras de crimen organizado en manos de grupos de pandillas.

El Presidente Sánchez Ceren, en su informe del segundo año de gobierno, consideró el tema de la seguridad pública como una prioridades en su administración, y sostuvo que la puesta en marcha de las medidas extraordinarias están dando resultados positivos. Él hizo énfasis en la reducción de homicidios y otros delitos considerados de alto impacto en la sociedad salvadoreña, la cual se ha visto agobiada por el accionar de grupos y estructuras criminales conformadas por las dos principales pandillas “MS” y Barrio “18”.

En enero del presente año los homicidios alcanzaron la cifra de 740, en febrero se contabilizaron 664, en marzo 611, en abril 353, en mayo 351 y en junio, se contabilizaron 331 homicidios a nivel nacional , el promedio del mes de junio alcanzó la cifra de 11 homicidios por día y en enero era de 24 homicidios por día ( según la estadística de la Policía Nacional Civil).

La política original del FMLN de hacer una trasformación profunda de El Salvador se frustró por la ayuda masiva que el gobierno estadounidense dió al gobierno y sectores conservadores y especialmente a las fuerzas de seguridad desde 1980 hasta la paz negociada en 1992.. Según la perspectiva norteamerican, han parado un revolución comunista. El partido fundado por Roberto d’Abuson (ARENA) y la ultra derecha mayormente dominó la política salvadoreña hasta la elección de Mauricio Funes a la presidencia de la república en 2009 pero el FMLN no tenía mayoría en la Asamblea Legislativa y tuvo que seguir una línea menos radical. La condiciones socio-económicas en el país, la falta de cambios estructurales y el aumento de las deportaciones de las Estados Unidos en los últimos años, son factores que han influido en la formación y aumento de las maras o pandillas en el país centroamericano. Por ejemplo, de acuerdo a informes de la dirección general de migración de El Salvador, Estados Unidos deporta a cerca de 20 mil personas al año, solo en año 2014 la cifra de deportados alcanzó las 28,942 personas y en el año 2015 el número de deportados fue de 21, 752.. Así que ese conjunto de factores ha ido generando mucha más violencia de las maras, hasta llegar a niveles intolerables para la población en general.

Los niveles de inseguridad generados por estos grupos delictivos se aumentaron, y el gobierno se sintió obligado tomar medidas drásticas en contra el crimen organizado, y desde mayo del presente año, echó andar un plan de “medidas extraordinarias” aprobadas y avaladas por unanimidad por los miembros del parlamento salvadoreño, conformado por las fracciones del partido gobernante Frente Farabundo Martí para la Liberación Nacional (FMLN), así como también por los diputados de la opositora de derecha, la Alianza Republicana Nacionalista (ARENA) y otros partidos minoritarios, quienes lograron un consenso para apoyar al gobierno central en el combatir los niveles de violencia inaceptables..

Estas medidas , fueron orientadas en primer momento hacia siete centros penitenciarios ubicados en distintos puntos del territorio salvadoreño, desde donde los principales cabecillas de pandillas estaban ordenando extorsiones, asesinatos y otros crímenes por medio de comunicación con sofisticados aparatos celulares que eran introducidos de manera ilegal al interior de las prisiones. Para parar esta actividad se considera necesario aislar la señal de los teléfonos celulares, y de tal manera cortar la comunicación de los criminales desde el interior de las prisiones hacia afuera. Por su parte la policía nacional civil, en coordinación con las autoridades penitenciarias, y después de que el gobierno presionó las empresas telefónicas, realizó una supresión de comunicación celular y acciones operativas en los contornos de las cárceles para reducir la presencia de personas ligadas a miembros de grupos delictivos.

Después de organizar un grupo anti-pandillero dentro de la policía y el resultado incremento en violencia hacía la policía y sus familiares, el gobierno de la FMLN organizó la Fuerza Especializada de Reacción de El Salvador (FES) en base del conjunto de medidas extraordinarias en materia de seguridad. La Fuerza Especializada de Reacción El Salvador (FES), es un grupo elite conformado por mil hombres, entre 600 miembros del ejército y 400 policías, quienes han conformado patrullas y han sido diseminados en el territorio nacional, especialmente en áreas rurales, donde hay fuerte presencia de grupos de pandillas, mientras en las zonas urbanas la policía también cuenta con el apoyo del ejército para mantener la presencia gobermental controlando los territorios que han sidos en disputa con las maras.

El trabajo de la FES no únicamente se fundamenta en la represión del delito sino también en fomentar la confianza entre la ciudadanía honrada y decente que se ve afectada por estos grupos delictivos.

Pero más allá de todas las acciones operativas y preventivas que ejecuta el gobierno salvadoreño para mejorar los niveles de seguridad de sus habitantes, la población -- ya harta de la violencia-- reflejó su confianza en la Fuerza Especializada de Reacción (FES). En la más reciente encuesta de la CID Gallup Latinoamerica, publicada en el mes de mayo de 2016, revela que el 29% de los consultados dijo que esta fuerza hará mucho en el combate a la delincuencia, contra un 27% que dijo que hará poco, un 25% sostuvo que la fuerza hará algo, un 14% de los encuestados dijo que esta fuerza no hará nada y un 5% dijo no saber .

El Comisionado Howard Cotto director general de la Policía Nacional Civil, a casi tres meses más de la vigencia de las medidas extraordinarias mantiene que los homicidios se han visto reducidos significativamente. El funcionario detalla que en enero de 2016, se contabilizaron 740 homicidios, lo que significaba 23.8 homicidios cada día, en febrero el promedio diario fue de 23 homicidios , seguido de marzo con 19.7 homicidios por día; mientras que en abril el promedio diario reflejo 11.7 homicidios , y en mayo de 2016 se cerró con 11.3 homicidios diarios. En cuanto al intercambio de disparos o enfrentamientos armados con grupos designados de terroristas (principalmente las pandillas), han ido en aumento. El dato la policía da hasta el 30 de junio del presente año cuenta que se han registrado 299 casos, en donde los agentes han sido atacados, en tales hechos 298 pandilleros han fallecido tras enfrentarse con las fuerzas de seguridad.

Pero se han registrado algunas denuncias de personas sobre los supuestos excesos de la fuerza policial, cuyos casos están siendo investigados por la procuraduría para la defensa de los derechos humanos en El Salvador, mientras las autoridades de seguridad afirman que no tolerarán abusos de esa naturaleza , porque resta la confianza y credibilidad entre la población. Otra medida es la permanente campaña de denuncia en contra de los 100 criminales ya identificados y más buscados, de los cuales 15 ya fueron arrestados gracias al trabajo de inteligencia y denuncia ciudadana.

Los resultados obtenidos en materia de seguridad, a través de las medidas extraordinarias, son “resultados alentadores” dijo el presidente salvadoreño durante su intervención al rendir el informe de su segundo año de gestión presidencial, al tiempo que agradeció al sector político del parlamento la aprobación de 152 millones de dólares destinados al financiamiento de la seguridad pública. Y para financiar estas iniciativas, el gobierno ratificó una taza de 5% en el servicio telefónico y la venta de aparatos telefónicos Las medidas extraordinarias están funcionando bien, aseguran las autoridades del gobierno y si la tendencia de reducción de homicidios sigue como hasta ahora afirma el director de policía, “ de continuar la tendencia así, por primera vez estaremos poniendo el primer semestre de este año en verde, es decir que tendremos menos homicidios que en el primer semestre del año anterior.” A la par de las medidas extraordinarias de seguridad, el gobierno salvadoreño también impulsa otros programas complementarios de carácter social que involucra a los jóvenes, con el propósito de alejarlos de la violencia pandilleril, e incluirlos en programas de desarrollo educativo y que estos tengan mayores oportunidades en el campo laboral.

Pero hay que preguntarse si es posible mantener estas bajas en los índices de violencia y diminución en los números y poder de las pandillas, si la policía podía mantener su presencia en los espacios donde han suprimido la violencia pandillera, si la falta de empleo y otras posibilidades para los jóvenes pueden mejorarse de una manera suficiente para hacer más difícil el reclutamiento de jóvenes a las maras, y, por fin, si la policía puede proteger y no molestar los jóvenes y sus familias de una manera suficiente para convencerles que no tienen que confirmarses al régimen pandillera en su barrio.

Abstract, The Bolivian Climate Justice Movement: Mobilizing Indigeneity in Climate Change Negotiations by Kathryn Hicks and Nicole Fabricant

:::::: Abstract ::::::

The Bolivian Climate Justice Movement: Mobilizing Indigeneity in Climate Change Negotiations 
by Kathryn Hicks and Nicole Fabricant

The Bolivian Platform against Climate Change is a coalition of civil society and social movement organizations working to address the effects of global warming in Bolivia and to influence the global community. Many of the organizations use indigenous philosophy and worldviews to contest normative conceptions of development. A study of the growth of this movement drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in 2010 reveals a complex relationship between state and nonstate actors that has had a striking impact on the global community despite the failure of multilateral climate change negotiations.

Abstract, Latin American Studies Journals at a Critical Juncture

:::::: Abstract ::::::

Latin American Studies Journals at a Critical Juncture 

At the Thirty-third International Congress of the Latin American Studies Association in 2015, Latin American Perspectives sponsored a featured session entitled “Latin American Studies Journals at a Critical Juncture.” Suggested themes and issues for discussion were the following:

How can journals best serve as a means of dialogue between academics in Latin America and the global North?

Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Book, "FOR-GET Identity, Media, and Democracy in Chile" by Claudia Bucciferro


The election of Michelle Bachelet, the first female president of Chile, brought to the public sphere topics such as gender, inequality, and the legacy of seventeen years of military rule. Former dictator Augusto Pinochet instructed Chileans to “for-get” and move on, but this is complicated because individual and collective identities are anchored in memory and articulated through discourse. What happens to a nation and its people when the obliged referent of their recent history is one that hardly anyone wants to address? This book reveals the incongruity between what current media say...

Monday, August 1, 2016

Abstract, Unsettling Times: Living with the Changing Horizons of the Peruvian Andes by Mattias Borg Rasmussen

:::::: Abstract ::::::

Unsettling Times: Living with the Changing Horizons of the Peruvian Andes 
by Mattias Borg Rasmussen

As in many other parts of the Peruvian Andes, the peasants of rural Recuay report receding glaciers, altered patterns of precipitation, and disappearing species of plants and wildlife among the many things that may unsettle the everyday. Susan Whyte’s concept of uncertainty highlights the fact that climate change emerges in different ways in particular situations. It informs water politics and local lives but is not a priori the most important part of the story. Rather than adapting to climate change, people adapt climate change to their social worlds.